social class

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social class

1. Social standing or position. Synonym: socioeconomic status
2. A group of people with shared culture, privilege, or position.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The upper class owns even the banks that credit the lower-class members:
Building from Warner's social-class schema, the authors typed the schools as thoroughly middle-class institutions that discriminated against lower-class pupils.
64), a more thorough investigation of middle-class renditions of these values would be necessary to support the claim that they are being imposed on dancehall's lower-class participants from above.
After presenting this empirical analysis, the authors describe other higher education trends that work against the interests of lower-class students.
The word caifanes is a calo [Mexico City lower-class slang] reworking of the Mexican phrase "caer bien" meaning to get along with or to be perceived as pleasant.
One of the most significant papers for social work was anthropologist's Walter Miller's 1959 publication in Social Service Review, "Implications of Urban Lower-Class Culture for Social Work." There, Miller (1959) argued, "The various social-class groupings in our country represent distinctive cultural traditions whose influence on behavior is as compelling as that of ethnic cultures or, in some respects, more so" (p.
This dichotomy between aristocratic and lower-class London is central to Dillon's thesis: that London's gin craze, viewed through the woozy lens of alcohol abuse, was really about class struggle.
lower-class races for the dummies and better races, with owners' silks, for the in-crowd.
Yet, much of the work of these societies sought to regulate women in lower-class positions to menial jobs, training them to be good maids and servants.
One result of these endeavors is a fuller, more nuanced picture of not only the quotidian world of Russia's lower classes but also how "lower-class Russians experienced, interpreted, appropriated, and sometimes resisted change, and the complex intertwining of culture, class, economics, and politics" (5).
When the play's 26-year-old author John Osborne was described in print as an "angry young man," the label was extended to all his contemporaries who expressed a rage at the persistence of class distinctions, a pride in their lower-class mannerisms, and a dislike for anything highbrow or "phoney."
Lower-class patients may have been more reluctant to accept the added burden of participating in the stress-monitoring program, the researchers suggest.