low-protein diet


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low-protein diet

Etymology: ME, lah, low; Gk, proteios, first rank, diaita, way of living
a diet proportionally low in protein, usually designed for persons who must restrict protein intake because of a metabolic abnormality associated with kidney failure or liver disease.

low-protein diet

Nutrition
A diet that provides less than 1.5 g/kg/day of protein during growth periods or less in adults. Adults with renal failure should receive no less than 0.6 g/kg/day of protein to avoid a negative nitrogen balance; low-protein diets are indicated for patients with renal failure, as reduced protein reduces anorexia, nausea, vomiting and if begun early, may slow the progression of disease.

low-protein diet

Clinical nutrition A diet that provides < 1.5 g/kg/day of protein during growth periods, or less in adults; adults in renal failure should receive no < 0.6 g/kg/day of protein, to avoid a negative nitrogen balance; LPDs are indicated for Pts with renal failure, as reduction of protein ↓ anorexia, N&V, and if begun early, may slow disease progression. See Diet.

low-protein diet

A diet that contains a limited amount of protein. The principal sources of food energy are fats and carbohydrates. This diet is used to treat end-stage renal and hepatic disease.
See also: diet
References in periodicals archive ?
Another study affirming the value of a low-protein diet was published in Archives of Neurology (vol 44, p.
Just 3 weeks into the study - before any measurable changes in body composition had occurred, the women on the low-protein diet had a 46-percent drop in normal muscle response to this test.
A low-protein diet (13pc of energy consumed) with a high glycemic index (GI), a low-protein, low-GI diet, a high-protein (25percent of energy consumed), low-GI diet, a high-protein, high-GI diet, a control group which followed the current dietary recommendations without special instructions regarding glycemic index levels and a high-protein, low-GI diet works best.
The researchers found the low-protein diet induced changes in hormonal signals of bone metabolism, which may negatively impact bone health.
Scientists have recently come to suspect that a low-protein diet or drug use can also trigger the heart problem in people with long QT syndrome.
One study showed a low-protein diet was associated with a greater rate of bone loss, whereas another study associated a high-protein diet with a greater rate of bone loss.
But the mice eating the low-protein diet never built effective cages.
The findings were based on clinical trials involving 60 men and 90 women aged 35 to 65, "all of whom had normal cholesterol levels and were consuming a low-protein diet.
The researchers speculated that inhaling low levels of this gas could lead to fertility problems in women eating a low-protein diet.
Only 12 men on the low-salt, low-protein diet suffered a recurrent stone.
Serum selenium concentrations from 60 patients treated with a low-protein diet showed that, despite a protein-restricted diet, in infancy serum selenium concentrations were mostly (87%) within the reference intervals established in this study.
The long-term effects of a low-fat, low-protein diet are easy to guess: a perpetual feeling of insatiety, a relentless, gnawing, hunger for more.