low-protein diet


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low-protein diet

Etymology: ME, lah, low; Gk, proteios, first rank, diaita, way of living
a diet proportionally low in protein, usually designed for persons who must restrict protein intake because of a metabolic abnormality associated with kidney failure or liver disease.

low-protein diet

Nutrition
A diet that provides less than 1.5 g/kg/day of protein during growth periods or less in adults. Adults with renal failure should receive no less than 0.6 g/kg/day of protein to avoid a negative nitrogen balance; low-protein diets are indicated for patients with renal failure, as reduced protein reduces anorexia, nausea, vomiting and if begun early, may slow the progression of disease.

low-protein diet

Clinical nutrition A diet that provides < 1.5 g/kg/day of protein during growth periods, or less in adults; adults in renal failure should receive no < 0.6 g/kg/day of protein, to avoid a negative nitrogen balance; LPDs are indicated for Pts with renal failure, as reduction of protein ↓ anorexia, N&V, and if begun early, may slow disease progression. See Diet.

low-protein diet

A diet that contains a limited amount of protein. The principal sources of food energy are fats and carbohydrates. This diet is used to treat end-stage renal and hepatic disease.
See also: diet
References in periodicals archive ?
The appearance of micro-albuminemia and/or low eGFR is an opportunity to start low-protein diet to prevent complications and improve the quality of life.
If you choose to feed a low-protein diet, you should supplement with carnitine and taurine to help prevent the development of DCM.
SERUM SELENIUM CONCENTRATIONS IN HEALTHY CHILDREN AND IN PATIENTS ON A LOW-PROTEIN DIET
Rando and colleagues observed that offspring of the mice fed the low-protein diet exhibited a marked increase in the genes responsible for lipid and cholesterol synthesis in comparison to offspring of the control group fed the standard diet.
Gao, Yallampalli, and Yallampalli of the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, found that the high maternal testosterone levels associated with a low-protein diet are caused by reduced activity of an enzyme that inactivates testosterone, allowing more testosterone to reach the fetus and increase the offspring's susceptibility to adulthood hypertension.
Gao, Yallampalli, and Yallampalli of the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston report that in rats, the high maternal testosterone levels associated with a low-protein diet are caused by reduced activity of an enzyme that inactivates testosterone, allowing more testosterone to reach the fetus and increase the offspring's susceptibility to adulthood hypertension.
Additionally, at the end of one year, some of the rats were switched from a high-protein diet to the low-protein diet and had a significant reduction in liver cancer by the end of the second year.
A low-protein diet can speed the dissolution of struvite stones--when accompanied by appropriate antibiotic treatment--but it is not necessary for the prevention of struvite formation in dogs who are prone to this problem.
Compared to the recommended 58 grams of protein per day for a 160-pound adult (about the average weight of volunteers in the potassium group), the low-protein diet consisted of 36 grams of protein a day, and the high-protein diet consisted of 109 grams of protein a day.
The recommendation of a low-protein diet is rather controversial.
While eating the low-protein diet, all 18 patients recorded fewer off periods and averaged about 100 fewer minutes of off time per day than while on the balanced diet.
Because phenylalanine is a component of proteins, patients must follow a strict low-protein diet, avoiding meat, fish, eggs, poultry, dairy and soy products, as well as products containing the artificial sweetener aspartame.