poverty

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pov·er·ty

peniaphobia.

poverty

[pov′ərtē]
Etymology: L, paupertas
1 a lack of material wealth needed to maintain existence.
2 a loss of emotional capacity to feel love or sympathy.

poverty

The state of being deprived of the essentials of well-being, such as adequate housing, food, sufficient income, employment, access to required social services and social status. The most commonly used threshold of low income in the UK is a household income that is ≤ 60% of the average (median) British household income. In 2008/9, poverty was defined in terms of the amount of money left after income tax, council tax and housing costs (rent, mortgage interest, buildings insurance and water charges) have been deducted: £119 per week for single adult with no dependent children and £288 per week for a couple with two dependent children under 14. These sums of money represent what the household has left to spend on food, heating, travel, entertainment, and any needs or wants. In 2008/09, 13 million people in the UK were living in households below this low-income threshold—i.e., 22% of the population—compared 12 million at that level in 2004/05.

poverty

(pov′ĕrt-ē) [Fr. poverté, fr L. paupertas]
The condition of having an inadequate supply of money, resources, or means of subsistence. In 2010 in the U.S., for example, a family of four earning less than $22,000 was considered to live in poverty.

poverty of thought

The mental state of being devoid of thought and having a feeling of emptiness.
References in periodicals archive ?
Several factors have made it difficult for low-income customers to access solar energy.
The decision follows a series of collaborative meetings with stakeholders to define the energy-related value-added products and services that must be provided to low-income customers, to consider available technologies and mechanisms for implementing point-of-sale confirmation of low-income customers, and to consider how best to protect existing low-income customers who are served by ESCOs.
The IRS has indicated that when a project contains relatively few units, it is concerned that the 20% rule will not produce a sufficiently accurate estimate of the remaining units' overall compliance with habitability or low-income requirements.
Why, then, do the vast majority of low-income, high-achievers not apply to very selective colleges?
For example, initial costs--such as security deposits in rental housing or down-payments for buying a home--are prohibitive for low-income families.
And while much rhetoric and HUD policies circulate around an "ownership society" emphasis on home buying, most low-income Americans compete for shelter within a profoundly depleted affordable rental stock.
The book essentially shreds the assertions of selective colleges that they have long provided a leg up in admissions to hard-working low-income students.
A married couple heads more than 1/2 of low-income working families.
Danish employment minister Claus Hjort Frederiksen reportedly said he was pleased that so many of Denmark's low-income wage earners were able to work their way into the middle class.
In addition, some pharmaceutical companies will tie their "patient assistance program" (PAP) to the cards for those who meet the low-income requirement--so that after they have used up their $600 credit they will get certain drugs free or at low cost from the manufacturer.
Listing off the 17 Chicago sites he manages, Hardy said he didn't think the geographic distribution of H&R Block offices indicates they target low-income people.
For example, there is no cohesive theoretical framework guiding research on fatherhood, existing measures were generally based on maternal templates, and there was a general lack of experience with all facets of the research process in including low-income men in large-scale studies designed primarily for mothers and children.

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