low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion


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Related to low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion: HPV, colposcopy

low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LGSIL, LSIL),

term used in the Bethesda system for reporting cervical/vaginal cytologic diagnosis to describe a spectrum of noninvasive cervical epithelial abnormalities; these lesions include the cellular changes associated with human papillomavirus cytopathologic effect and mild dysplasia (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1).
See also: Bethesda system, reactive changes, ASCUS, atypical glandular cells of undetermined significance.

low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion

Gynecologic cytology A lesion of the uterine cervix which is characterized by cells occurring singly or in sheets, nuclear abnormalities in cells with mature cytoplasm, bi- or multinucleation, well-defined optically clear perinuclear halo, distinct cell borders and others that translate into either HPV infection or mild dysplasia–CIN 1 of uterine cervix–a diagnosis made on biopsied tissue. Cf High-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion.

low-grade squa·mous in·tra·ep·i·the·li·al le·sion

(LGSIL, LSIL) (lō-grād skwā'mŭs in'tră-ep'i-thē'lē-ăl lē'zhŭn)
Term used in the Bethesda system for reporting cervical/vaginal cytologic diagnosis to describe a spectrum of noninvasive cervical epithelial abnormalities; these lesions include the cellular changes associated with human papillomavirus cytopathologic effects and mild dysplasia (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1).
See also: Bethesda system, reactive changes, ASCUS, atypical glandular cells of undetermined significance

low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion

Abbreviation: LGSIL
A cytological abnormality found in Papanicolaou tests (Pap tests) where there are early mild changes in the epithelial cells covering the outside of the cervix. Causes include infection with human papillomavirus, cervical trauma, or postmenopausal changes. Risk factors include intercourse with multiple sex partners or a partner with multiple sex partners, unprotected sex at a young age, history of sexually transmitted disease, and tobacco use. About 60% of LGSIL will spontaneously resolve. If left untreated, a small number of women eventually develop cervical cancer.
See also: lesion
References in periodicals archive ?
Human papilomavirus testing for triage of women with cytologic evidence of low-grade Squamous intraepithelial lesions: baseline data from randomised trial.
Low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) were seen in 57%, atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) in 30%, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) in 7%, and atypical squamous cells in which HSIL cannot be excluded (ASC-H) in 5.5%.
Reduction in poor quality specimens using the thin-layer method Thin-layer Conventional smears (n = 18,712) (n = 11,521) % Change Less than optimal 2,419 (13%) 2,876 (25%) -48.0 Unsatisfactory 4 (0.02%) 32 (0.28%) -92.9 Diagnostic detection rates of thin-layer versus conventional screening Thin-layer Conventional smears (n = 18,712) (n = 11,521) % Change ASCUS 451 (2.4%) 272 (2.4%) 0 LGSIL 759 (4.06%) 152 (1.32%) +207.6 HGSIL 366 (1.96%) 111 (0.96%) +104.2 ASCUS:SIL ratio 0.40 0.84 -52.4 ASCUS = atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance; SIL = squamous intraepithelial lesions; LGSIL = low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions; HGSIL = high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions.
More than half of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions in adolescents have regressed at 12 months; 91% regress by 36 months (Lancet 2004;364:1678-83).
In uninfected women, the mean time to progression from atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) to low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), or worse, is approximately 88 months; however; lesions infected with oncogenic HPV types show marked progression within 67 months.
The two types of samples retrieved had similar sensitivity and specificity for both atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (see box).
The majority of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions will regress spontaneously in adolescent females, so most treatment guidelines allow for the observation of these lesions through repeated cytology, said Dr.
Among three cases of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), one regressed spontaneously, and a biopsy in another found cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3).
However, many were also using HPV testing for patients with Pap test results showing higher-grade lesions; 84% said they used it for atypical squamous cells results (cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions); 61% said they used it for low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions results; and 46% said they used it for high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions results, Dr.
This included a group of t4- to 20-year-olds with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) and a second group of teens with high-grade squamous lesions (HSIL).
When an HIV-positive patient is referred with an ASCUS (atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance) and LSIL (low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions) Pap, "be absolutely certain that you do a very careful inspection of the vulva, and do liberal biopsies" of anything that looks abnormal.
Low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), the most common manifestation of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, persist or progress to high-grade lesions or cancer in 20%-30% of adults, Dr.

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