low-grade astrocytoma


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low-grade astrocytoma

A relatively slow-growing brain cancer made up of glial cells that have an atypical cellular appearance when viewed microscopically. They are known under the WHO grading system as grade II astrocytomas. The median survival after diagnosis is 7 to 8 years.
See also: astrocytoma
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References in periodicals archive ?
The tumor was misdiagnosed as low-grade astrocytoma. Panel b and c: H and E stained section of the tumor revealed features of an ependymoma
Variations in the natural history and survival of patients with supratentorial low-grade astrocytomas. Neurosurgery 1996; 38: 872-9.
(37) Additionally, alterations in MYB and MYBL1, primarily fusion events, have been observed in angiocentric gliomas and low-grade astrocytomas. (30,45) Clinical trials for targeted therapy addressing some of these various abnormalities are ongoing or in development.
Pathological and molecular advances in pediatric low-grade astrocytoma. Annu Rev Pathol.
Rosenthal fibers and granular bodies, although conceivable in the context of low-grade astrocytoma, have not been documented to date.
The most common misdiagnosis was low-grade astrocytoma (39%), followed by nondiagnostic biopsy (18%), highgrade astrocytoma (15%) and, less frequently, oligodendroglioma, infarction, infection, or lymphoma.
Sometimes, inaccurate terms like "low-grade astrocytoma" or "brainstem glioma" are used that obscure this distinction.
(18-21) Nakamura et al (20) additionally revealed a strong tendency toward down-regulation of p14ARF protein immunoreactivity during progression from low-grade astrocytoma to glioblastoma.
In the current study, low-grade astrocytomas (Grade 1 a n d 2) showed intense GFAP staining mostly in the fibrillary processes, whereas the grade 3 astrocytomas showed cytoplasmic staining.
Multiple low-grade astrocytomas may be seen in the spinal cord in the setting of neurofibromatosis type 1.
Low-grade astrocytomas are more common in young adults, whereas high-grade astrocytomas primarily affect older adults.

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