low-dose aspirin

low-dose aspirin

Vascular disease A minimal dose of aspirin administered daily to a person known to be at risk for coronary artery occlusion
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Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- Low-dose aspirin does not prolong disability-free survival of healthy people over 70, even in those at the highest risk of cardiovascular disease.
Summary: Washington D.C [USA], Sep 1 (ANI): Low-dose aspirin does not prolong disability-free survival of healthy people over 70, even in those at the highest risk of cardiovascular disease, finds a study.
Aspirin may protect against dementia in type 2 diabetes !-- -- Daily low-dose aspirin reduce the incidence of dementia by more than one-third in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the randomized JPAD 2 study.
Participants aged 40 years or older were asked whether they had been told to take low-dose aspirin each day to prevent or control heart disease, whether they were following this advice, and whether they were taking low-dose aspirin on their own.
The latest American College of Chest Physicians guideline for antithrombotic and thrombolytic therapy recommends the addition of low-dose aspirin (50-100 mg/day) to warfarin therapy in patients with mechanical heart valves at low bleeding risk (4).
A There have been several studies in recent years suggesting that low-dose aspirin of 80 milligrams (mg) may help improve cognition.
Subsequently, heart experts began prescribing daily low-dose aspirin therapy (i.e., 75 or 81 mg) to those who have had a previous heart attack or stroke and those who have a high risk for either.
By DOROTHY KWEYU Health experts have warned against arbitrary use of aspirin in managing high blood pressure.Responding to an emailed inquiry by this writer, Dr Loise Nyanjau of the Ministry of Health (MoH) said low-dose aspirin increases the risk of brain haemorrhage.
"A woman at risk should take low-dose aspirin (75mg or 100mg a day), starting before 15 weeks of pregnancy.
These individuals already have cardiovascular disease and should continue to take low-dose aspirin daily, or as recommended by their health care provider, to prevent another occurrence, said Michos, associate director of preventive cardiology at the Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Maryland.
Low-Dose Aspirin May Protect Against Ovarian Cancer

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