low libido


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low libido

A sexual dysfunction marked by inhibited sexual desire and inability to sustain arousal during sexual activities. Diminished sexual drive may be related to advanced age, psychogenic causes, general illness, side effects of some medications, or substance abuse.

In men it manifests as partial or complete failure to attain or maintain erection until completion of the sex act. In women there is partial or complete failure to attain or maintain the vaginal lubrication-swelling response of sexual excitement until completion of the sex act.

See: table
See also: libido
References in periodicals archive ?
Evaluating and treating low libido in menopausal women
05 ( ANI ): Turns out, coping with low libido is as easy as believing that your sex drive can change.
A total of 36 healthy postmenopausal women with low libido were selected to participate in this study in Brazil.
3 CHECK YOUR MEDS If you take medication, check with your GP that it's not contributing to your low libido. If you're taking one of the following drugs you may benefit from changing, but always talk to your doctor first: anti-psychotics such as Chlorpromazine, anti-anxiety medication such as Benzodiazepines, anti-depressants such as Clomipramine, or beta blockers such as Propranolol.
Although routine testosterone levels are not warranted in all patients receiving venlafaxine, clinicians aware of this possible association may consider obtaining free and total testosterone levels before and after starting venlafaxine in selective patient populations, such as those reporting fatigue or low libido. As testosterone supplementation is not without its own adverse effects, supplementation is considered on a case-by-case basis after discussion with endocrinologist.
revealed that women with low libido had lower than normal activity in the entorhinal cortex, an area of the brain involved in storing positive emotional memories.
Low levels of testosterone can cause low libido, fatigue, depression, cognitive problems, changes in body composition and increased chronic disease and cardiovascular risk for both men and women.
Low androgen levels can be a problem as well, producing effects such as low libido (interest or desire in sex), fatigue, decreased sense of well-being and increased susceptibility to bone disease.
For example, if a male has low libido and erectile dysfunction in standard healthcare, he would be diagnosed with erectile dysfunction (799.89) and placed on medications to stimulate the body to increase blood supply to the genitals.
Moderate and mild adverse effects considered include effects on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, headache, irregular bleeding, ovarian cysts, depression, low libido, and vaginal infections.
She reports that her relationship with her husband is excellent, and she wonders if she can take a hormone for her low libido.