love

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Related to loves: Lowes
Drug slang A regionally popular street term for crack cocaine
Psychology The personal experience and manifest expression of emotional attachment or bonding to another person
Types Sacred and profane love, and affectional and erotic love. The word is also used in the vernacular as a synonym for like or fancy
Sports medicine Nil, naught (tennis)
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

love

[ME.]
1. Profound concern and affection for another person.
2. In psychoanalysis, love may be equated with pleasure, particularly as it applies to the gratifying sexual experiences between individuals.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in classic literature ?
A boy's love comes from a full heart; a man's is more often the result of a full stomach.
Ah, lad, cherish love's young dream while it lasts!
I love not your festivals either: too many actors found I there, and even the spectators often behaved like actors.
Let the future and the furthest be the motive of thy to-day; in thy friend shalt thou love the Superman as thy motive.
And we are fortunate above most, for we have found our first love in each other."
The policeman thought I was drunk; and I was, too - with love for you."
The mysterious, enchanting Kitty herself could not love such an ugly person as he conceived himself to be, and, above all, such an ordinary, in no way striking person.
Love was a necessity of my existence; this need for affection had never been satisfied, and only grew stronger with years.
My life seemed to be growing cold within me; I was bending under a load of secret misery when I met the woman who was to make me know the might of love, the reverence of an acknowledged love, love with its teeming hopes of happiness--in one word--love.
Let them see by your patient love and care how much fairer they might be, and when next you come, you will be laden with gifts from humble, loving flowers."
That if we will not call such disposition love, we have no name for it.
All this is perhaps folly--perhaps insanity; but tell me what woman has a lover more truly in love; what queen a servant more ardent?"