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ground

 [grownd]
1. a path of conduction from an electrical circuit to the earth.
2. to connect an electrical circuit or electrical equipment to the earth.
3. zero electrical potential.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ground

1. Basic substance or foundation.
2. Reduced to a powder; pulverized.
3. In electronics, the negative or earth pole that has zero electrical potential.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

figure

A part or pattern in the visual field which has the perceptual attribute of completeness and is perceived as distinct from the rest of the field which forms the ground. Example: a printed word against a background page.
ambiguous figure An image or drawing arranged in such a way that its perception oscillates or flips involuntarily between, usually, two interpretations even though the retinal image remains constant, thus indicating that higher cortical processing are involved. Syn. reversible figure. See Blivet figure; Kanizsa figure; illusion; Necker cube; Rubin's vase; Schroeder's staircase.
Blivet figure An 'impossible' figure in which three apparently solid tubes are attached at one end of a rectangular base which projects only two bars (Fig. F4). See Necker cube; Schroeder's staircase; Rubin's vase.
fortification figure See scintillating scotoma.
Kanizsa figure An ambiguous figure in which the illusory contour of a square (or triangle) appears in the middle of four (or three) truncated solid squares (or circles). It is an illustration of the perceptual ability to make sense of an incomplete figure by creating a 'whole' image from the separate elements (Gestalt organization). Some people cannot perceive the contour. Syn. Kanizsa square (Fig. F5).reversible f. See ambiguous figure.
Fig. F4 Blivet figureenlarge picture
Fig. F4 Blivet figure
Fig. F5 Kanisza figureenlarge picture
Fig. F5 Kanisza figure
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
The public also generally perceives that race relations have improved on Bush's watch -- 40% say the country has gained ground in this area versus 25% who say it has lost ground. But that could largely be ascribed to Barack Obama's election as the nation's first black president, something that doesn't reflect directly on Bush's leadership in this area.
From the moment he was sworn in February 3, Snow has moved aggressively to regain lost ground. Unlike O'Neill, he knew the president when he arrived.
Close challengers Treherbert lost ground after losing 11-3 at home to Pill Harriers, for whom Matthew Sheen crossed for the only try of the game.
But Zestril gradually made up the lost ground and, forging to the front approaching the final furlong, she ran on strongly to defeat Mrs P by one and a quarter lengths.
Latinos have nearly reached parity with non-Latino Whites in the earning of bachelor's degrees, but Latinos have lost ground in the rate of master's degrees they earn.
Suppliers now want to reclaim that lost ground and even recoup some recent price increases in chlorine feedstock.
Indeed, in certain respects the process has lost ground. A brief summation of our analysis by the four variables outlined reveals more precisely the various obstacles involved in the path to democratization in Egypt in the 1990s.
Over the same period, the nonmetro/metro earnings ratio fairly steadily declined from 81 to 73 percent, indicating the extent to which rural workers have lost ground relative to urban workers in the national economy.
The trial further indicated that 24 percent of the surgery group actually lost ground at their 6-month checkup, dropping three or more lines of vision.
Professional dance has lost ground in the last five years and, while generating creative solutions to the financial shortfalls is essential, the precipitous decline continues: Based on figures compiled from recent volumes of Stern's Performing Arts Directory, the total number of ballet and modern dance companies in North America has declined from 1989 to 1994 by nearly 10 percent.
By the end of the nineteenth century, the therapeutic function of the asylum had lost ground to the custodial.
Some lost ground. The causes were not the tax cuts but record high interest rates and the back-to-back recessions of 1980-82.