lossy compression

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lossy compression

Telemedicine A format for data transmission which compresses, transmits and decompresses at the receiving end with a 'tolerable' loss of imaged data. See Data compression, Telemedicine; Cf Codec, Loss-less compression, Modem, T-1.
References in periodicals archive ?
If your combination of bit rate and interconnect length lands you in the red zone, you'd better worry about lossy line effects.
In addition, its integrated equalizer is designed to overcome signal degradation when long (greater than 20m) and lossy cables are used.
In a survey of almost 2,000 consumers worldwide, 75% of respondents stated it is most important to have the highest quality wireless connectivity in one room, rather than lossy, compressed video delivered around the whole home.
A key element is Fulcrum's QoS feature set, which enables lossless Ethernet desirable for storage traffic to converge onto the same fabric carrying lossy Ethernet.
These high voltage parts allow systems of a given power rating to operate at higher voltages and lower currents where the noise filtering becomes less lossy resulting in higher efficiency inverters.
March 13 /PRNewswire/ -- Currently lossy algorithms are not used by radiologists in primary diagnosis because physicians and radiologists are concerned with the legal consequences of an incorrect diagnosis based on a lossy compressed image.
The connector is made with a high-performance, low-loss RF material to reduce dielectric loss and provide a higher degree of impedance control through the link as well as reduced crosstalk compared to lossy FR-4 designs.
ImageI/O supports both pristine lossless and lossy compression, providing developers with increased flexibility in their image application development needs.
The codec will support resolutions of up to 5K, bit depth up to 16 bits, and deliver lossless and lossy quality.
Founder and CTO of Dust Networks, Kris Pister, also co-authored a set of formal requirements for routing in low power and lossy networks approved by the IETF.
LinkSwitch-II features Power Integrations' advanced primary-side regulation (PSR) technology, which utilizes a transformer winding to sense the output current rather than relying on lossy, expensive secondary-side components to provide feedback and regulate the output.