unconsciousness

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unconsciousness

 [un-kon´shus-nes]
an abnormal state of lack of response to sensory stimuli, resulting from injury, illness, shock, or some other bodily disorder. A brief loss of consciousness from which the person recovers spontaneously or with slight help is called syncope or faint. Deep, prolonged unconsciousness is known as coma. See also levels of consciousness.

un·con·scious·ness

(ŭn-kon'shŭs-ness),
An imprecise term for severely impaired awareness of self and the surrounding environment; most often used as a synonym for coma or unresponsiveness.

un·con·scious·ness

(ŭn-kon'shŭs-nĕs)
An imprecise term for severely impaired awareness of the self and the surrounding environment; most often used as a synonym for coma or unresponsiveness.

unconsciousness

A state of unrousability caused by brain damage and associated with reduced activity in part of the BRAINSTEM called the reticular formation. Unconsciousness varies in depth from a light state, in which the unconscious person responds to stimuli by moving or protesting, to a state of profound coma in which even the strongest stimuli evoke no response. Causes include head injury, inadequate blood supply to the brain, fainting, asphyxia, poisoning, near drowning, starvation, low blood sugar (HYPOGLYCAEMIA) and severe KETOSIS.

un·con·scious·ness

(ŭn-kon'shŭs-nĕs)
An imprecise term for severely impaired awareness of self and surrounding environment; most often used as a synonym for coma.
References in periodicals archive ?
In our study, the level of COHb was found to be above 30% in the patients who presented with loss of consciousness and seizure.
Evidence-Based Cantu Grading System for Concussion (23) Grade Evidence Grade 1 (mild) No loss of consciousness; posttraumatic amnesia a or postconcussion signs or symptoms lasting less than 30 minutes Grade 2 (moderate) Loss of consciousness lasting less than 1 minute; posttraumatic amnesia a or postconcussion signs or symptoms lasting longer than 30 minutes but less than 24 hours Grade 3 (severe) Loss of consciousness lasting more than 1 minute or posttraumatic amnesia a lasting longer than 24 hours; postconcussion signs or symptoms lasting longer than 7 days (a) Retrograde and anterograde.
The loss of consciousness (LOC) can be the mani- festation of intracranial injury or concussion head injury.9 It is an established consequence in many maxillofacial injuries especially mandibular fractures.
First, the clinicians confronted with patients with sudden loss of consciousness should avoid limiting the scope of diagnostic thinking before evaluating all probable causes, and before postulating some diagnoses and treatment according to the postulated one, some underrecognized causes as carotid sinus syncope should be searched.
In other words, immediate loss of blood supply to the brain leads to almost instantaneous loss of consciousness.
Another 17% (435) reported some other injury during deployment with no loss of consciousness or altered mental status, most commonly resulting from a fall or injury during training.
The condition does not always produce symptoms but the classic warning sign is a sudden severe headache thatmay cause loss of consciousness.
government health statistics say concentrations of H2S greater than 500 parts per million can cause loss of consciousness and can be lethal.
A day before admission she had generalized tonic clonic convulsions that progressed to status epilepticus, followed by loss of consciousness. On admission, she had a temperature of 40[degrees]C, pulse 110/min, blood pressure 126/80 mm Hg, and neck stiffness.
He moves all extremities, has no neck pain, no loss of consciousness, but doesn't remember getting hit, the quarter, or who the opponent is.
19%) to report the recent onset of at least 1 of 15 serious symptoms, such as shortness of breath, chest pain, persistent headache, or loss of consciousness. About 58% of insured and uninsured people with a new symptom believed they needed to see or talk to a medical provider.