ground

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ground

 [grownd]
1. a path of conduction from an electrical circuit to the earth.
2. to connect an electrical circuit or electrical equipment to the earth.
3. zero electrical potential.

ground

Etymology: AS, grund
1 (in electricity) a connection between the electric circuit and the ground, which becomes a part of the circuit.
2 (in psychology) the background of a visual field that can enhance or inhibit the ability of a patient to focus on an object.

ground

1. Basic substance or foundation.
2. Reduced to a powder; pulverized.
3. In electronics, the negative or earth pole that has zero electrical potential.

figure

A part or pattern in the visual field which has the perceptual attribute of completeness and is perceived as distinct from the rest of the field which forms the ground. Example: a printed word against a background page.
ambiguous figure An image or drawing arranged in such a way that its perception oscillates or flips involuntarily between, usually, two interpretations even though the retinal image remains constant, thus indicating that higher cortical processing are involved. Syn. reversible figure. See Blivet figure; Kanizsa figure; illusion; Necker cube; Rubin's vase; Schroeder's staircase.
Blivet figure An 'impossible' figure in which three apparently solid tubes are attached at one end of a rectangular base which projects only two bars (Fig. F4). See Necker cube; Schroeder's staircase; Rubin's vase.
fortification figure See scintillating scotoma.
Kanizsa figure An ambiguous figure in which the illusory contour of a square (or triangle) appears in the middle of four (or three) truncated solid squares (or circles). It is an illustration of the perceptual ability to make sense of an incomplete figure by creating a 'whole' image from the separate elements (Gestalt organization). Some people cannot perceive the contour. Syn. Kanizsa square (Fig. F5).reversible f. See ambiguous figure.
Fig. F4 Blivet figureenlarge picture
Fig. F4 Blivet figure
Fig. F5 Kanisza figureenlarge picture
Fig. F5 Kanisza figure
References in periodicals archive ?
We speculate that blacks are losing ground relative to whites because they attend lower-quality schools that are less well maintained and managed as indicated by signs of social discord.
And as for the old libertarian Murray who derided the social engineers in Losing Ground, well, he's gone.
Auletta: Did you make a mistake in the last section of Losing Ground, where you speculated on whether or not we would not be better off just getting rid of all welfare.
By size worldwide for all RPTVs, the 40"-44" and 45"-49" segments gained ground in Q1'05 due to their attractive price points which are approaching $1999 after losing ground the past few quarters.
This means integrating new delivery networks like WLAN and moving towards mobile VoIP, otherwise they risk losing ground to fixed-line operators, who are aggressively seeking to incorporate mobile services into their portfolios.
Suhurwardy said Bhutto also was losing ground in Sindh, her home province and traditional power base.
While paper is losing ground in competitive primary packaging markets, it will continue to dominate secondary packaging and shipping applications due to the popularity of corrugated boxes.
There's always the potential for one side losing ground and one side gaining ground.
To what degree are manually adjusted thermostatic controls losing ground to automatic and semi automatic systems?
The Dell'Oro Group shows NEC's worldwide KTS revenues increased nearly 13% in 2002, while major competitors were losing ground compared to 2001.