lorgnette

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lorgnette

Eyeglasses for occasional use, held before the eyes by a handle, into which the lenses may fold when not in use (British Standard). See spectacle lens; spectacles.
References in periodicals archive ?
He was continuously unfolding and laying out for our beauties gauze made of cob-webs sprinkled with butterfly wings, or watches the size of a pinhead, or a lorgnette made of fly eyes that let one see everything that was happening all around in an instant, or blonde laces that melted at a touch, or shoes made of dragonfly claws, or feathers made of bee hairs, or, unfortunately, rouge that stuck to the cheek when blown into the air.
One of them surely plans to do so, since the title of the engraving makes it an illustration of the historical enterprise: "Le grand historiographe d'Afrique, en observation" While he surveys the scene in wide perspective, his assistant looks down through his lorgnette toward the source of the smoke, the Fort de l'Empereur just outside the city walls, the explosion of which was the fatal blow for the defenders of Algiers.
14) This point of interesection between gazes assisted, intercepted, or censored recalls issues central to Jann Matlock's work on the lorgnette (42 ff).
William Rosenthal buys, sells and appraises items connected with vision, including spectacles, lorgnettes and opera glasses.
Where are such things now, and where are the fans with diamond-studded lorgnettes set in the handle, with leaves of painted silk?
They include superb evening wear from the 1850s, a wedding dress from the 1860s, silk tennis outfits from the 1920s, children's clothing, swimwear and accessories such as lorgnettes, beaded handbags and tortoiseshell spectacles.
The aunts sat by the wall in an uneasy silence, but they recognized a song that was older than themselves and one after another they dropped their lorgnettes to take up the interrupted melody.
The hosting Lampe family is comprised of clumsy nouveau riches--he a former master baker, she a former cook--who make their money manufacturing noodles and who compensate for their lack of ease in their new, "elevated" settings by exaggerated snobbery and elegant props, from lorgnettes to boas.
Louis's or Natchitoches' token woman writer, then the mean-spirited passage introducing the journalist, a guest at Edna's bacchanalian banquet, becomes doubly ironic: Mayblunt is a woman "no longer in her teens, who looked at the world through lorgnettes and with the keenest interest.
The opposite is true of what the English called prospect glasses and the French called lorgnettes (from lorgner - to squint), the purpose of which was simply to spy on one''s companions without being observed doing so - the practice became so widespread it grew intrusive and distasteful.
Communist propaganda," Nabokov writes, depicted Russian emigres as "villainous generals, oil magnates, and gaunt ladies with lorgnettes.
Lorgnettes, the ballet, the loge, a fine restaurant (Talon in Petersburg, Automne in Odessa): as published, these evocations form the bookends of Eugene Onegin, with the poet first exiled to the south, then to his estate, with the Italianate nights of Odessa in the Journey evoking the Italian nights mentioned in 1:49 and also, in a sense, replacing them.