lore

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lore

(lôr)
n.
The space between the eye and the base of the bill of a bird or between the eye and nostril of a snake.

lor′e·al (lôr′ē-əl) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
She said, "Le Lores is about the customers, and it is about a commitment to their beauty.
Terry Gwynn-Jones tells of her birthplace, date, and bloodline in his biography Pioneer Aviator: 'Maude Rose (later 'Lores') Bonney [sic] was born in Pretoria, South Africa, on 20 November 1897.
I must confess a partiality for tikbalangs, the creature of our lore that was most often used to frighten me as a child.
Critique: Showcasing a wealth of information that is expertly and accessibly presented, "Monsters and Creatures: Discover Beasts from Lore and Legends" is an extraordinary read from beginning to end and will prove to be an immediate and enduringly popular addition to community and academic library collections.
Each of the six chapters (plus the introduction and conclusion) is between 20 and 30 pages and utilizes different methodological and theoretical frames to examine the industry lore that permeates a particular time period and genre.
Lore's stark style fits perfectly with the plot of each piece, and readers will be left wanting more.
Here the ideas of electricity are woven with alchemical lore in a presentation that surveys the ether to ideas of space travel, film, and even computers.
Cooking With Aphrodisiacs: Create Passion On A Plate, from the studies and expertise of culinary expert Cheryl Blevins, is an ingenious instructional application of DVD technology showcasing educational information on the history and lore of asparagus, avocados, basil, grapes, oysters, strawberries and seven other aphrodisiacs.
In a laudable effort to recover the interplay of literacy and orality among women and children, chapter 3 studies the tales, songs, lullabies, word games, and riddles of nursery lore. While a lot of the fireside songs and stories told to children of all classes belonged squarely to popular lore and remained relatively isolated from the influence of the written word, Fox manages to trace some back "to the great monastic chronicles of the twelfth and the thirteenth centuries" (198).
In conveying the prevalence and function of these themes in the four selected plays, Pereira draws upon an impressive knowledge of black music and African lore to situate each work within a realistic historical context.