lordosis


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Related to lordosis: cervical lordosis

lordosis

 [lor-do´sis]
1. the anterior concavity in the curvature of the lumbar and cervical spine as viewed from the side.
2. abnormal increase in this curvature. See also kyphosis and scoliosis. adj., adj lordot´ic.
Abnormally increased curvature of the lower spine characteristic of lordosis. From Dorland's, 2000.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lor·do·sis

(lōr-dō'sis), [TA]
An anteriorly convex curvature of the vertebral column; the normal lordoses of the cervical and lumbar regions are secondary curvatures of the vertebral column, acquired postnatally.
Synonym(s): hollow back, saddle back
[G. lordōsis, a bending backward]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lordosis

(lôr-dō′sĭs)
n. pl. lordo·ses (-sēz)
1. An abnormal forward curvature of the spine in the lumbar region.
2. The mating posture displayed by female rodents and certain other mammals, in which the back is arched downward and the hindquarters are raised.

lor·dot′ic (-dŏt′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

lordosis

Orthopedics Spinal lordosis, swayback The forward curvature of the lumbar spine, causing the normal concavity of the lower lumbar region of the back  Etiology↑ abdominal contents–eg, pregnancy or extreme obesity, poor posture, flexion contracture of hip, rickets, TB of spine.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lor·do·sis

(lōr-dō'sis)
1. [TA] A normal anteriorly convex curvature of the vertebral column.
2. Hyperlordosis; an abnormal anteriorly convex curvature of the spine, usually lumbar.
Compare: hyperlordosis, hyperlordotic
[G. lordōsis, a bending backward]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lordosis

An abnormal degree of forward curvature of the lower part of the spine, often associated with abnormal backward curvature of the upper part (KYPHOSIS). Lordosis is an exaggeration of the normal forward curve and often causes the buttocks to appear unduly prominent.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

lor·do·sis

(lōr-dō'sis)
[TA] A normal anteriorly convex curvature of the vertebral column.
[G. lordōsis, a bending backward]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Uphouse, L., Andrade, M., Caldarola-Pastuszka, M., Jackson, A., 1996.5-HT1A receptor antagonists and lordosis behavior.
In the crouch position it is very important to emphasise a neutral cervical spine in natural lordosis. Players are therefore recommended to have their chin up and off their chests, but not hyperextended (tilted backward).
In addition to side-to-side curves (scoliosis), screeners also reported any other irregularities associated with the spine, including front-to-back curves such as kyphosis or lordosis.
When compared to conventional MRI, axial loading produced an increase in lumbar lordosis, a decrease in lumbar spine height and bidirectional changes in intervertebral disc height (increase at L1-L3 and decrease at L4 and L5).
Pretesting consisted of Trunk Rotation which indicated good rotation; Internal and External Hip Rotation which indicated excessive internal rotation of 55-60[degrees] and external rotation with hard endfeel at 40[degrees] with "clicking of the right hip when stepping over hurdles"; a negative Ober Test for tightness of the Tibial-Femoral Ligament; and a negative Thomas Test for hip extension without lordosis. Brachial Chain examination revealed bilateral restriction on the left side and minimal on the right.
Lordosis, one of the most common postural problems, is due to tight iliopsoas and hamstrings, over-developed quadriceps, weak abdominals and lower back.
2 Mechanical neck pain, brachial plexus pain, carpel tunnel syndrome, kyphosis, lordosis, scoliosis, sciatica and mechanical low back pain are few of the problems most commonly encountered in breastfeeding mothers.
It has been found that extent of potentiation of lordosis and soliciting behavior after the destruction of the lateral septum has been increased not only in females [11,12] but also in male rats.
Lumbosacral (LSA), lumbar lordosis, and thoracic kyphosis angles were measured using a digital inclinometer (Baseline[R]; Fabrication Enterprises Inc., White Plains, NY USA).