loose-jointed


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loose-jointed

(lo͞os′join′tĭd)
adj.
1. Having freely articulated, highly mobile joints.
2. Limber or agile in movement.

loose′-joint′ed·ness n.
References in periodicals archive ?
But she always told me how baby flew free from the loose-jointed mother or maybe she was thrown.
Relieved of this drudgery soon after, and not being able to afford "such luxuries as food and lodging," Mark Twain, nee Samuel Clemens, now becomes "the Bohemian from the sagebrush." He makes friends with writer Bret Harte, is published in literary magazines, and in his developing "jocular, loose-jointed style of writing," admits to enjoying the view from his living quarters--"filtered through the bottom of a whiskey glass." Upon one of his several moves, he was spotted leaning against a lamppost with a cigar box under his arm.
Such loose-jointed, hollow skeletons (about 18 inches high) are sold almost everywhere around Halloween.
Skeletal features characteristic of the person with Marfan syndrome include: a very tall, slender, loose-jointed body with disproportionately long arms, legs and fingers, and often some scoliosis; a breastbone that protrudes (pigeon chest) or is concave; a long and narrow face, with a high roof of the mouth and crowded teeth; and an inversion of the ankles, especially the left one.
Such patients are unusually tall and loose-jointed, have long, spider-like fingers, and may suffer from dislocated eye lenses.
But here is Schall, loose-jointed, supple-faced, close-cropped, clothed in a dapper wide-striped suit, looking as if he'd stepped from a drawing by George Grosz.
Every installation of these works is unique, as the uncontrollable, willowy mass of loose-jointed metal bits always arranges itself anew.
Better yet, the keep-it-moving pacing imposes an illusion of structure on the loose-jointed story of how they struggled to hang on to their friendship while chasing fame, fortune and gorgeous women.
But when he was recalled-some authors have had him dying in office--it was not just a result of factional housecleaning in Britain but of the ascendance, in England, of an imperial faction including the Earl of Halifax, who looked with jaundiced eye on the loose-jointed North American empire and blamed incumbent royal officials.
The immediately winning paintings are the so-called private pictures: "loose-jointed" views from back windows, impressions of empty bedrooms or the flotsam of a rural backyard, pictures admired even by Julius Meier-Graefe, the Francophile critic who otherwise deplored Menzel's uncouth naturalism.
In the lead role of Josh, the loose-jointed Jim Newman wisely avoids any similarity to the movie's Tom Hanks, instead incorporating physical business that couples energetic comic invention with personable credibility.