loose-jointed


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loose-jointed

(lo͞os′join′tĭd)
adj.
1. Having freely articulated, highly mobile joints.
2. Limber or agile in movement.

loose′-joint′ed·ness n.
References in periodicals archive ?
But she always told me how baby flew free from the loose-jointed mother or maybe she was thrown.
Such loose-jointed, hollow skeletons (about 18 inches high) are sold almost everywhere around Halloween.
Skeletal features characteristic of the person with Marfan syndrome include: a very tall, slender, loose-jointed body with disproportionately long arms, legs and fingers, and often some scoliosis; a breastbone that protrudes (pigeon chest) or is concave; a long and narrow face, with a high roof of the mouth and crowded teeth; and an inversion of the ankles, especially the left one.
Such patients are unusually tall and loose-jointed, have long, spider-like fingers, and may suffer from dislocated eye lenses.
But here is Schall, loose-jointed, supple-faced, close-cropped, clothed in a dapper wide-striped suit, looking as if he'd stepped from a drawing by George Grosz.
Better yet, the keep-it-moving pacing imposes an illusion of structure on the loose-jointed story of how they struggled to hang on to their friendship while chasing fame, fortune and gorgeous women.
Here's Kelley, showing incredible technique for a 15-year-old, first twitching his body into the horrifying convulsions of ``Lynching Blues,'' then loose-jointed as a scarecrow, with a pasted-on smile and a curly-haired mannequin for a partner, in the wickedly funny segment that parodies Bojangles Robinson and Shirley Temple, ``The Uncle Huck-A-Buck Song.
But when he was recalled-some authors have had him dying in office--it was not just a result of factional housecleaning in Britain but of the ascendance, in England, of an imperial faction including the Earl of Halifax, who looked with jaundiced eye on the loose-jointed North American empire and blamed incumbent royal officials.
Wong Kar-wai makes raucous, loose-jointed, love poem--like films with oddly decisive titles--Fallen Angels, Happy Together, even the super-propulsive (if inconclusive) Chungking Express.
In the lead role of Josh, the loose-jointed Jim Newman wisely avoids any similarity to the movie's Tom Hanks, instead incorporating physical business that couples energetic comic invention with personable credibility.
Loose-jointed gamines in wacky hats and midi skirts sashay; bereted chaps in overalls cartwheel; everybody saunters in syncopation, like a New Orleans jazz funeral promenade.