loose bodies

loose bod·ies

(lūs bod'ēz)
Fragments of cartilage or bone within a joint cavity. They usually result from previous trauma and are not always symptomatic.

loose bodies

Small pieces of bone or of the CARTILAGE bearing surface of joints that have become detached and may interfere with the smooth functioning of the joint. They are a feature of OSTEOARTHRITIS.
References in classic literature ?
Behind their backs small clusters and loose bodies tumbled from side to side.
The cartilage foci become pedunculated and may be sequestrated into the synovial cavity to form multiple loose bodies, often in pearly clumps resembling sago "snowstorm knee".
They are commonly described as being small, pea sized and loose bodies, owing to their mobile nature, unlike in our patient.
Radiographies revealed characteristic finding of SC including multiple calcified loose bodies within the right hip joint.
Kusumi and coworkers concluded that the primary pathologic change in OCD lesions is damaged articular cartilage induced by repeated stress followed by a degenerative and reparative process of articular cartilage and subchondral fracturing resulting in separation of loose bodies.
Epiploic appendages may sometimes calcify and detach becoming intraperitoneal loose bodies (8).
Loose bodies and damaged tissue under the patella were removed, the patella was smoothed out, and a lateral release was done.
Even after the complete extraction of all cartilaginous loose bodies and radical synoviectomy, chondromatosis can reappear.
Blue Jays left-hander Daniel Norris underwent arthroscopic surgery Tuesday to remove bone spurs and loose bodies in his pitching elbow.
The second MRI revealed marked irregularity involving the undersurface of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus with multiple loose bodies.
Plain radiographs of the knee joints revealed joint effusions with multiple rounded intraarticular loose bodies, erosions on the medial aspect of the tibial plateau, tricompartmental joint space narrowing, osteophytes, subchondral cyst formation, heterotopic bone formation, and lateral subluxation of the tibia on the femur (Figure 1, 2).
Current medical therapy is centered around non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, while surgical treatment consists primarily of arthroscopic examination and excision of loose bodies from the joint space with limited synovectomy of the affected synovium.