shuttle

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shut·tle

(shŭt'ĕl),
A going back and forth regularly; used in respect to certain transport processes across a biomembrane.

shuttle

Space medicine
Any of the five—Columbia, Challenger, Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour—reusable spacecraft that carried personnel and equipment into orbit, providing platform of the cutting-edge research critical in constructing the largest structure in space, the International Space Station. The first mission was launched in April 1981; the last space shuttle mission, STS-135, ended in July 2011.

shuttle

(shŭt′l)
To transport an object back and forth; in cell biology or biochemistry, to carry a molecule repeatedly across a cell membrane.

shuttle

the transport of electrons or organic groups across biological membranes.

shuttle system
means of transfer of reducing equivalents as NADH and H+ from the cytosol to mitochondria. The two main systems are: α-glycerophosphate shuttle and malate-aspartate shuttle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Much to my surprise, my husband decided to build another room at the side of the garage just for the loom.
Most students chose to cover the entire loom and then layered the other colors on top of the first one.
People think of art as something to hang on walls, or sculpt on pedestals,'' said Bingham, who with Jarchow uses old-style hand looms and spinning wheels to create elaborately designed scarves, tapestries, capes, blankets, stoles and handbags.
The power loom sector accounts more than 90% of the total fabric production.
Using a paintbrush handle that's squared off on the bottom, punch holes on opposite sides of the area cut out of the loom.
Since installation, the new oven has greatly improved the ergonomics of the wiring loom fitting, while the fast response of the emitters also provides energy savings, as they can be switched on and off rapidly as required.
While the White Whale looms over the narrative of Moby-Dick, Wright reverses Melville's color iconography to give his reader "a Negro Bigger Thomas [who] loom[s] as a symbolic figure of American life, a figure who would hold within the prophecy of our future" ("How" 522).
Remember Ronald Holley and his coworkers, who lost their jobs when the Fruit of the Loom plant closed in 1995?
221) In other words, the period that witnesses the peasantry at its most individualistic, employing both the land and the loom, is relatively brief, lasting essentially from the 1760s to the 1780s, and that raises questions of what long-term implications should be drawn from this study.
Fruit of the Loom set up shop in Buncrana five years before Western Europe opened up as a free-trade zone.
In weaving technology, the Draper automatic loom, introduced in 1895, was a breakthrough invention whose fundamental design remained the industry standard, unrivaled by any twentieth-century textile innovation until the development of shuttleless looms after the Second World War.
40,000 out of our savings," said Hiremath, Loom head of engineering.