longitudinal muscle

longitudinal muscle

n.
Either of the lingual muscles: inferior lingual and superficial lingual.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the present study was undertaken to assess and confirm the histological differences in the neuronal and longitudinal muscle layers of colon and rectum of adult and neonate rats.
The muscularis layer is composed of an inner circular muscle and outer longitudinal muscle.
A circular smooth muscle layer surrounding the longitudinal muscle layer is found in proximal urethra but was found absent in bladder neck in a study on Japanese women.
An alternative explanation is that the longitudinal muscle fibers of the head retractor muscle control the head retractions associated with ventilation.
There are reports of a pathological deficiency in the longitudinal muscle layer within the wall of the SVC, as well as an association with cystic hygromas [8].
Progressive activation of p44/42 MAPK in response to ischemia and reperfusion was chiefly localized to the crypts of Lieberkuhn, circular and longitudinal muscle layers, whereas p38 MAPK was prominently activated in myenteric plexus and both muscle layers.
Longitudinal muscle is mainly concerned with peristalsis --the movement of the contents along the gut toward the anus.
Serial longitudinal muscle sections of 4 [micro]m) were deparaffinated in xylene, rehydrated in graded ethanol, and then pretreated by microwave (Brastemp; Sao Paulo, Brazil) with 10 mM citric acid buffer (pH = 6) for 3 cycles of 5 min each at 850 W for antigen retrieval.
The group also outfitted the robot with wires running along its length, in a similar way to an earthworm's longitudinal muscle fibres.
They noted that the creepy crawler is made up of two main muscle groups: circular muscle fibers that wrap around the worm's tubelike body, and longitudinal muscle fibers that run along its length.
It arises from the K-J space, a muscular dehiscence inferior to the cricopharyngeal muscle and lateral to the longitudinal muscle of the esophagus.
This was by Jean Cruveilier, Professor of Descriptive Pathology in Paris, who wrote, (and I translate from his French), 'We not infrequently find between the bands of longitudinal muscle in the sigmoid a series of small, dark, pear-shaped tumours, which are formed by herniation of the mucosa through openings in the muscle coat'.

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