longevity

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lon·gev·i·ty

(lon-jev'i-tē), [MIM*152430]
Duration of a particular life beyond the norm for the species.
See also: lifespan.
Synonym(s): macrobiosis
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

longevity

(lŏn-jĕv′ĭ-tē, lôn-)
n. pl. longevi·ties
a. Long life; great duration of life: His longevity vexed his heirs.
b. Length or duration of life or viability: comparing the longevity of men and women; factors that affect the longevity of seeds.

lon·ge′vous (-jē′vəs) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

longevity

Duration of life.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, lawn GEH vih tee
Medspeak-US: pronounced, lawn JEH vih tee
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

longevity

The condition of having a long life, or having lived a long life; the average life expectancy of adults continues to spiral upward; the upper limit of average human life expectancy may range from 85 to 100. See Lifespan.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lon·gev·i·ty

(lon-jev'i-tē)
Duration of a given life beyond the norm for the species.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

longevity

the life-span of an organism.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

lon·gev·i·ty

(lawn-jev'i-tē) [MIM*152430]
Duration of a given life beyond the norm for the species.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
This yields isoclines of maximum fitness for different floral longevities, that is, combinations of daily floral maintenance (m) together with daily pollen and seed fitness-accrual rates (1 - p and 1 - g) that result in an optimal floral longevities of t = 1, 2, .
Further reductions in m shift optimal floral longevities to still longer durations ([ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 5 OMITTED]).
We found additional support for the model by examining literature data on floral longevity and rates of pollination, for example, species with short floral longevities tended to be those characterized by high rates of pollinator visitation, whereas species with longer-maintained flowers tended to be those characterized by lower rates of pollinator visitation (Ashman and Schoen 1995).