long-term memory


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Related to long-term memory: short-term memory

memory

 [mem´o-re]
the mental faculty that enables one to retain and recall previously experienced sensations, impressions, information, and ideas. The ability of the brain to retain and to use knowledge gained from past experience is essential to the process of learning. Although the exact way in which the brain remembers is not completely understood, it is believed that a portion of the temporal lobe of the brain, lying in part under the temples, acts as a kind of memory center, drawing on memories stored in other parts of the brain.
impaired memory a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as inability to remember bits of information or behavioral skills.
immunologic memory the capacity of the immune system to respond more rapidly and strongly to a subsequent antigenic challenge than to the first exposure. See also memory cells and immune response.
long-term memory the aspect of memory in which knowledge is stored permanently, to be activated when cued; it is theoretically unlimited in capacity.
recent memory the ability to recall events from the immediate past.
remote memory the ability to recall events from the distant past.
screen memory a consciously tolerable memory serving to conceal or “screen” another memory that might be disturbing or emotionally painful if recalled.
short-term memory what one is conscious of at a given moment; in contrast to long-term memory it is of limited capacity (about seven items) and will be lost unless rehearsed and related to information in long-term memory.

long-term mem·o·ry (LTM),

the phase of the memory process considered the permanent storehouse of information that has been registered, encoded, passed into the short-term memory, then coded, rehearsed, and finally transferred and stored for future retrieval; material and information retained in LTM underlie cognitive abilities.

long-term memory

Anterograde memory, long-term potentiation, remote memory Neurology Memory in which information is stored in a permanent or semipermanent fashion. See Memory. Cf Short-term (immediate) memory.

long-term mem·o·ry

(LTM) (lawng'tĕrm mem'ŏ-rē)
That phase of the memory process considered the permanent storehouse of information that has been registered, encoded, passed into the short-term memory, coded, rehearsed, and finally transferred and stored for future retrieval; material and information retained in LTM underlies cognitive abilities.

long-term mem·o·ry

(LTM) (lawng'těrm mem'ǒ-rē)
Phase of memory process considered as the permanent storehouse of information that has been registered, encoded, passed into the short-term memory, then coded, rehearsed, and finally transferred and stored for future retrieval.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was argued that changes in the intercept of the speech-rate/span function could be interpreted as an indication of differing long-term memory contributions to span.
Long-term memory holds the human's mass of available knowledge[3].
However, when long-term memory was tested, the enhanced sensitivity was only detected in memory for graphic items.
All these findings suggest that an extranuclear ERK pool is necessary for long-term memory consolidation in this arthropod model.
Alan Baddeley's YOUR MEMORY: A USER'S GUIDE (1552979857 $24.95) provides an illustrated new edition for specialists and non-specialists alike, surveying how memory works, the mechanics of short- and long-term memory, and the latest research in psychology pertaining to memory.
ECSTASY users could damage their long-term memory, research showed today.
Ordinary people whose long-term memory has not faded pay homage to this short-term pope.
Some of this information in short-term memory may then go on to long-term memory, where it is stored and from which it can be retrieved.
LONG-term memory does not fully develop until the end of a child's second year, scientists reported yesterday.
New research published in the January 2000 issue of Bioelectro-magnetics suggests that exposure to microwaves may affect long-term memory function in rats.
For example, scientists are rethinking "short-term memory," which was considered as a sort of staging area for incoming data to be prepared for dumping into the brain's "hard disk" or long-term memory. Now "working memory" is the place where incoming data go to "a kind of blackboard where the mind performs its computations, and where it posts its partial results for later use."
He exhibited explosive, violent outbursts and inappropriate verbal responses, as well as having poor short- and long-term memory. From the start, SD was fixated on leaving the facility and returning to his home in the Pittsburgh area.

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