long-day plant


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long-day plant

one that requires a day length exceeding a certain minimum value for the induction of flowering to take place. In fact, the term is somewhat misleading in that such plants (e.g. lettuce, clover) are really sensitive to periods of darkness rather than daylight, requiring a night length of no more than a maximum duration, i.e. these are short-night plants. Compare SHORT-DAY PLANT, DAY-NEUTRAL PLANT. see PHYTOCHROME.
References in periodicals archive ?
1993) compared a long-day plant, Sinapis alba, with a short-day plant, Xanthium strumarium, and suggested the existence of a shoot-to-root signal which is under photoperiodic control and affects cytokinin synthesis in and/or release from the roots.
Long-day plants generally flower in spring or early summer.
com, and MSN Live Search, find more information by searching for these words or phrases: plant growth and development, photoperiod, phytochrome, plant biological clocks, short-day plants, long-day plants, day neutral plants, plant hormones, auxin, IAA, parthenocarpic fruit, apical, gibberellins, bioassay, cytokinins, abscisic acid, ethylene, postharvest physiology, flowering hormone, tropisms, and nastic movements.
Long-day plants only flower when the dark period is shorter than a certain critical length.
Long-day plants (shasta daisies and Gypsophila) flower when the dark period is shorter than a specified length.
Lin (2000) concluded that phyB inhibition of flowering was more apparent in noninductive photoperiods for both short- and long-day plants.