loiasis


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loiasis

 [lo-i´ah-sis]
infection with nematodes of the genus Loa; called also loaiasis.

lo·i·a·sis

(lō-ī'ă-sis),
A chronic disease caused by the filarial nematode Loa loa, with symptoms and signs first occurring approximately 3-4 years after a bite by an infected tabanid fly. When the infective larvae mature, the adult worms move about in an irregular course through the connective tissue of the body (as rapidly as 1 cm/minute), frequently becoming visible beneath the skin and mucous membranes; for example, in the back, scalp, chest, inner surface of the lip, and especially on the conjunctiva. The worms provoke hyperemia and exudation of fluid, often a host response to the worm products, a Calabar or fugitive swelling that causes no serious damage and subsides as the parasites move on; the patient is annoyed by the "creeping" in the tissues and intense itching, as well as occasional pain, especially when the swelling is in the region of tendons and joints. Many patients have marked eosinophilia (10-40%).

lo·i·a·sis

(lō-ī'ă-sis)
A chronic disease caused by the filarial nematode Loa loa; symptoms first occur 3-4 years after a bite by an infected tabanid fly. When the larvae mature, the adult worms move about through connective tissue, frequently becoming visible beneath the skin and mucous membranes or while passing through the conjunctiva. The worms provoke hyperemia and exudation of fluid; the patient is annoyed by the perception of "creeping" in the tissues and intense itching, as well as occasional pain, especially when the swelling is in the region of tendons and joints.

loiasis

A type of FILARIASIS caused by the microfilarial worm parasite Loa loa . The disease occurs in Central and West Africa and features prominent lumps under the skin (Calabar swellings) caused by inflammatory reaction to the migrating worms. The adult worm sometimes appears under the CONJUNCTIVA of the eye. Also known as eye worm.
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Over the course of our study, we observed imported parasitic diseases such as malaria, cutaneous leishmaniasis, urogenital schistosomiasis and loiasis, none of which had local transmission in the country.
Loa loa is transmitted by Chrysops species horse flies and causes loiasis with high microfilarial burdens, angioedematous or Calabar swellings as worms migrate subcutaneously, and adult worms traversing the eyes in 3 to 13 million people in confined areas of sub-Saharan Africa (Figure 1).
Five cases of encephalitis during treatment of loiasis with diethylcarbamazine.
12) volvulus Simulium Africa, Along Central and free-flowing South rivers Larvae America, develop well Yemen in aerated water Loiasis (Fig.
However, the diversity of adverse symptoms is complicated in regions of co-endemicity of onchocerciasis with loiasis. Serious complications, such as severe and sometimes fatal encephalopathic adverse reactions and coma in patients with onchocerciasis combined with high intensity of Loa loa have been reported (Chippaux et al.
In most of the countries, the programme is based on once-yearly administration of single dose of two drug combination given together for 4-6 years: albendazole plus either diethylcarbanazine (DEC) or ivermectin, the latter in areas where either onchocerciasis or loiasis may also be endemic.
There are many human or primate only filarial nematodes such as Onchocera volvulus (river blindness), Wuchereria bancrofti (elephantiasis), and Loa loa (loiasis).
QCAN you tell me what drugs and treatment are used for the eye disease Loiasis that is spreading in this country?
A total of 6 types of diseases, including scrub typhus, visceral leishmaniasis (VL), Japanese encephalitis (JE), epidemic hemorrhagic fever, loiasis, and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, started to be imported in 2013.
Some hypotheses however incriminate malnutrition, viruses, plantain consumption (plantain with high serotonin content in the diet of East and West African groups), infection with Loa loa (loiasis) and rheumatic heart disease.
For example, a patient with a migrating subcutaneous (Calabar) swelling and a conspicuous eosinophil level returning from West Africa will most likely be suffering from loiasis. A patient presenting with exactly the same constellation of symptoms, usually with some latency after a sojourn in Thailand (or circumscribed parts of South America) and after ingestion of raw fish dishes (or else unusual meats such as bullfrog meat) would most likely be diagnosed as having gnathostomiasis.
Assessment of level of endemicity of loiasis in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria.