logorrhea

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Related to logorrheic: logorrhea, overage, foisted

logorrhea

 [log″o-re´ah]
excessive volubility, with rapid, pressured speech, as in manic episodes of bipolar disorder and some cases of schizophrenia. Called also lalorrhea, pressured speech, tachylalia, and tachyphasia.

log·or·rhe·a

(log'ō-rē'ă),
Rarely used term for abnormal or pathologic talkativeness or garrulousness.
[logo- + G. rhoia, a flow]

log·or·rhe·a

(lawg'ōr-ē'ă)
Abnormal or pathologic talkativeness or garrulousness.
Synonym(s): logorrhoea.
[logo- + G. rhoia, a flow]
References in periodicals archive ?
FRANCES STARK (HAMMER MUSEUM, LOS ANGELES; CURATED BY ALI SUBOTNICK WITH EMILY GONZALEZ-JARRETT) "Personally, I cannot stand the work It requires to ensure oneself a meaningful demise," Stark once mused, yet this survey proves she's been as busy as can be for a quarter century, converting reading, teaching, motherhood, and internet hookups into, well, work: elegant and logorrheic drawings, collages, and paintings, and, In recent years, smart, thrifty, excruciatingly honest--and, yes, logorrheic--videos.
The actors in American Hustle -- primarily Christian Bale, Amy Adams, Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence -- get to do so much: they dance, laugh uproariously, go on jazzy riffs as they spit out Russell's logorrheic dialogue.
(I'll always love Wolfe, who meant a great deal to me when I was younger, but one of my favorite stories about the logorrheic author is that he prefaced the manuscript that became Look Homeward, Angel with an assurance that "I do not believe the writing to be wordy, prolix, or redundant.") The assurance Kauffman refers to is from Wolfe's "Note for the Publisher's Reader," written in late March 1928 and submitted to various publishers with the manuscript of O Lost.
Like Dylan Thomas who envisions his father on the "sad height," Sleigh dramatizes the individual plights of three dying women and those who attend them in "Nomad," "Bridge" and "She Lived in a Wilderness." Of the logorrheic, dying woman in "Nomad," obsessed with war and child-soldiers, Sleigh says: "Her mind was magnetized//To disaster as once it was attracted / To quiet and study--." He introduces images of "particles," "stuffing," "dust," "winds" and "sand," which give the room a peculiar weather, a shifting climate in which the old woman's speech dissolves and devolves into Sleigh's shocking conclusion.
Informed by what seems to be a naturally occurring case of undeniably generative OCD--as well as a well-documented tendency toward almost logorrheic pedantry--Sachs's physical and conceptual constructions initially propose themselves as spontaneous and appealingly offhand.
In a welter of mixed metaphors perhaps appropriate for this logorrheic project, Ruiz recently explained his affinity for the novel: "This avalanche, this cataract of humiliations, of unexpected crimes and disasters, this river of painful loves and wounded hopes which doused the fertile valley of tears inhabited by Camilo's characters, I had known them forever.
The younger artist's two-page logorrheic run-on plumbs the unconscious, less perhaps Roth's than his own.
The title refers both to the forward slash, indicating something like a line break in Ebner's prose, and also to a sense that language here has ceased to work for its ideological employers and has turned in on itself in logorrheic protest.