logistic curve

(redirected from logistic curves)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

lo·gis·tic curve

an S-shaped curve that depicts the growth of a population in an area of fixed limits.

logistic curve

an S-shaped curve of numbers against time that represents the growth in numbers of a population of organisms in a limited environment. see GROWTH CURVE.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the logistic curves showed the best performance both in the convergence properties and the convergence weight (Table2).
As the vehicle speed decreases from high to low, [d.sup.sig.sub.n] also decreases, resulting in the CB-SB zones and logistic curves moving toward the intersection.
Phillips (2007) showed (following Modis (2002)) that logistic curves have no tipping points, but that the Bass model can be interpreted in a way that manifests a tipping point early in the life of the growth curve, though this tipping point is far from the inflection point.
The standard model still could be applicable because the increase in skipped spawning occurred at younger ages (4-15), the logistic curves reached 100% around age 12 (close to age 15), and fish commonly reach ages >50.
(3) The cumulative probability distribution of failure of the electrical components in distribution networks summarized in [14] is consistent with logistic curves. The generalized logistic distribution function was assumed as the logarithmic time to the failure of the electrical insulation equipment [15].
Results of the LSDM performance with observed scores on individual attributes shows that the APCs recovered with LSDM match well the ICCs of individual items for operations A1 and A2 but for A3 A4 and A5 the APCs tends to be over the ICCs on all the ability levels; these results may be explained by the conjunctive nature of the model, moreover, the product of logistic curves is not logistic, for this reason this work presents a descriptive and exploratory explanation, more than a statistical comparison between curves.
Sigmoid (S) shaped or logistic curves predict the carrying capacity which is the population that is sustainable in an environment.
Furthermore, the logistic curves all show a relatively flat peak, with a pronounced "hang time" near the peak.
The field data for BegShed, MaxShed, EndShed, and Silking of each treatment population were fit to standard logistic curves of the form:
The Gompertz and logistic curves are the two most widely used specifications of S-curves.