logic

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logic

Decision-making The sum total of education and experience that is integrated into a physician's medical decision-making processes. See Aunt Millie approach, Bayesian logic, Heuristic logic, Markov process, ROC analysis, Stochastic process.

logic,

n a disciplined method of reasoning or argumentation that employs the principles governing correct or reliable inference.

logic

the principles of reasoning.
References in periodicals archive ?
The second reason why the Just Ask Defence is logically flawed is
Participants who performed well in filtering important information on the strategic learning measure made more logically consistent financial decisions.
Wales has an excessive number of MPs at 40 for three million people but would logically have 30 MPs for its population.
The wealth of details are organized logically and parents will find it easy to navigate, making it an item of choice above others.
Murder on a Philosophical Note" is action packed, well planned and researched, and logically paced.
The ending is particularly impressive--and unpredictable but logically consistent.
Roughly comparable numbers of students thought mathematics helped them think logically and that mathematics was mostly memorizing formulas and rules.
It is refreshing to find a monograph that is soundly researched, logically argued, and women-centered, on, of all subjects, women and sex.
More than pleasure boats might be at issue: A decision against Norwegian Cruise Lines could also logically extend to all merchant marine vessels, which tend to register under foreign flags precisely to avoid this sort of U.
Instead of relying on separate physical SAN fabrics for different applications or user groups, storage administrators can segment a single common fabric into multiple, logically isolated fabrics.
Once a principle is established according to which a human being can be killed because he suffers, then logically it extends to all human beings who say they suffer--even if this is not true.
The few dark notes, such as learning about the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire and visiting the asylum with her father, do not prepare the reader for the events at the end that unfold so tragically and yet so logically, giving them an even greater impact.