latency

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Related to logic bomb: Macro virus, RFC 1157

latency

 [la´ten-se]
1. a state of seeming inactivity or being latent.
2. the time between the instant of stimulation and the beginning of a response.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

la·ten·cy

(lā'ten-sē),
1. The state of being latent.
2. In conditioning, or other behavioral experiments, the period of apparent inactivity between the time the stimulus is presented and the moment a response occurs.
3. In psychoanalysis, the period of time from approximately age 5 years to puberty.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

latency

(lāt′n-sē)
n. pl. laten·cies
1. The state or quality of being latent.
2. Psychology The latency period.
3. A latent period.
4. The time interval between initiating a query, transmission, or process, and receiving or detecting the results, often given as an average value over a large number of events.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

la·ten·cy

(lā'tĕn-sē)
1. The state of being latent.
2. In conditioning, or other behavioral experiments, the period of apparent inactivity between the time the stimulus is presented and the moment a response occurs.
3. psychoanalysis The period of time from approximately age five to puberty.
4. In physiology, delay between a stimulus and a response, especially with reference to auditory and neural conduction velocity tests.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Latency

The period of inactivity between the time a stimulus is provided and the time a response occurs.
Mentioned in: Pickwickian Syndrome
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the incidents listed above, three of them have one thing in common: they were logic bombs. The fourth incident, TexasAutoCenter, didn't even need logic bomb capabilities because the system itself was already pretty much designed to be a logic bomb.
Computer viruses, logic bombs, Trojan horses and worms: A computer virus can be implanted in an exchange and spread to exchange members.
It is known that US military planners are experimenting with computer viruses, "logic bombs," electronic disinformation, and "the morphing of video images onto foreign television stations to deceive."
Hackers, either state-sponsored or working independently, will use computer viruses such as worms, Trojan horses, logic bombs, and electronic bacteria to damage or destroy information.
The ever increasing importance of software to operate military hardware opens new vulnerabilities such as reasonably accurate inexpensive "logic bombs" and computer viruses.
The term virus includes variants, such as logic bombs (logic codes that turn on at prespecified times), worms (routines that overwrite existing memory), and Trojan Horses (viruses inhabiting legitimate software programs).
This can be done in a number of ways, of which the best known are "Trojan Horses", "Logic Bombs" and "Reproducing Viruses".
It also identifies any logic bombs hidden in the malware waiting for a trigger to cause damage at a later time.
Other destructive computer codes include the Trojan horse (which is a code that looks harmless but can cause problems once it gets into a system), logic bombs (which typically are the destructive codes embedded in vir-uses) and worms, which are much like viruses but have their own engines.
Many routinely make backup copies of their files every night to protect against logic bombs that might erase data.