locus of control


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locus

 [lo´kus] (L.)
1. a place or site.
2. in genetics, the specific site of a gene on a chromosome.
locus ceru´leus a pigmented eminence in the superior angle of the floor of the fourth ventricle of the brain.
locus of control a belief regarding responsibility for actions. Individuals with an internal locus of control generally hold themselves responsible for actions and consequences, while those with an external locus of control tend to believe that they are not able to affect a personal outcome and that luck or destiny are responsible for their actions.

lo·cus of con·trol

a theoretic construct designed to assess a person's perceived control over his/her own behavior; classified as internal if the person feels in control of events, external if others are perceived to have that control.

lo·cus of con·trol

(lō'kŭs kŏn-trōl')
1. A theoretic construct designed to assess a person's perceived control over personal behavior; classified as internal if the person feels in control of events, external if others are perceived to have that control.
2. biowarfare A place from which a terrorist event is evaluated and managed.

lo·cus of con·trol

(lō'kŭs kŏn-trōl')
A theoretic construct designed to assess a person's perceived control over personal behavior; classified as internal if the person feels in control of events, external if others are perceived to have that control.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Based on entrepreneurial behavior and self-determination theory, this study examined the influence of individual factors of micro-entrepreneurs' (risk taking behaviour, locus of control, perceived barrier, and self-efficacy) in predicting their intrinsic entrepreneurial success.
This study explores the moderating effect of personality trait (Locus of Control) amid of factors affecting restaurant image including (brand name, prices, consumer services, ambient factors) and restaurant's image.
(1999), "Perceptions of competence and locus of control for positive and negative outcomes: Predicting depression and adjustment to college", Personality and Individual Differences, Vol.
Donna (2001) explored that majority of the student prefer the learning styles on individual locus of control and academic achievement toward the learning conditions, and also the course achievement percentage was examined under the distance education setting.
Lastly, Acharya and Sangam (2010), conducted a research among 325 dental students at Manipal College of Dental Sciences in India to assess dental anxiety and discover its relationship with the perceived health locus of control among students using the multidimensional health locus of control (MHLC) scale (internal, chance and powerful others) and modified dental anxiety scale (MDAS) scale.
From the literature discussed in the introduction, the following hypotheses were formulated: (1) cumulative trauma, consisting of being abused over a long period, affects the thinking processes such as styles of attribution and, therefore, in older children a more external locus of control should be observed; (2) cumulative trauma leads to increased insecure type attachment working models, specifically of disorganized type, in older children; (3) age, and therefore multiple trauma, has a greater impact compared to attachment on the locus of control.
For example, poorer locus of control was shown to be associated with greater work-related stress, burnout [41], depression, emotional exhaustion and lack of accomplishments among nurses [30].
On the other hand, studies have demonstrated that males tend to show more external locus of control whereas females tend to have more internal locus of control (Andreoletti, Zebrowitz and Lachman, 2001).
Locus of control has been found to influence education and labor market outcomes.