locus of causality


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

locus of causality

(1) in attribution theory, a person's perception of whether the cause of their success or failure at a task is internal (due to personal factors, such as effort and ability) or external (due to external factors, such as luck or chance); (2) in self-determination theory, a person's perception of whether the origin of their reasons for engaging in a behaviour is internal (done willingly and out of free choice) or external (done because they are compelled or required to do so, either by external pressure from others or because of self-imposed pressures).
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Our research differs from that of Laufer and Gillespie (2004) because they did not examine the effect of locus of causality and also confined the dependent variable to blame attribution.
Intrinsic motivations correspond with an internal perceived locus of causality and are internally regulated; often, actions conducted under intrinsic motivation are done so because the individual inherently enjoys the activity and receives inherent satisfaction from it.
The second category of fluctuating motivational factors is the perceived locus of causality (Ryan & Deci, 2000).
The reliabilities of the scales in our sample are as follows: Locus of causality [alpha] = .
Table 1 presents the aggregated results for the coding of effects and their respective locus of causality.
Along these lines, the goal of this work was to validate the Spanish version of the only scale designed to measure in physical education classes diverse forms of motivation established by the self-determination theory, the Perceived Locus of Causality Scale (Goudas et al.
6% offered an internal locus of causality in describing why they started and an external locus of causality in describing problems.
High scores on the LOC, stability, and controllability scales indicate an internal locus of causality, a stable and controllable attribution respectively.
The present study found that students' causal attributions for exam performance tended to be controllable by the student, with locus of causality being within the student while the degree to which the student believed the cause to be stable varied across students.
Our choice, then, is to concentrate our efforts on the relationships between entrepreneurial behavior and (a) locus of causality (internal/ external) or (b) stability of causality (stable/variable).
After indicating the most likely cause, students responded to questions about locus of causality and controllability.
Building on the defensive attribution theory literature (Walster, 1966), we argue that the impact on consumer's brand evaluation depends on outcome severity and locus of causality, that is, whether the cause of the failure was the consumer, the brand, or a natural disaster.