loculation


Also found in: Dictionary.

loc·u·la·tion

(lok'yū-lā'shŭn),
1. A loculate region in an organ or tissue, or a loculate structure formed between surfaces of organs, mucous or serous membranes, and so on.
2. The process that results in the formation of a loculus or loculi.

loculation

[lok′yəlā′shən]
the presence of numerous small spaces or cavities.

loc·u·la·tion

(lok'yū-lā'shŭn)
1. A loculate region in an organ or tissue, or a loculate structure formed between surfaces of organs or mucous or serous membranes.
2. The process that results in the formation of a loculus or loculi.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pleural thickening or nodule [greater than or equal to] 1 cm, lung mass [greater than or equal to] 1 cm, abdominal mass, liver metastasis, absence of pleural loculation, pericardial effusion or cardiomegaly all were positively associated with a malignant aetiology.
We are most pleased to be working with our expert partners at ABL to move this new NIH SMARTT project forward, and hope it will be a key step that will introduce new and better therapy for pleural loculation into clinical practice.
Loculation of pericardial infection in the form of an abscess is rare.
These lesions have an outer zone of granulation tissue and a central purulent loculation surrounding the Actinomyces colonies.
However, even 2-3 weeks after symptom onset, a CT scan may show evidence of early organization and loculation of peripancreatic fluid that may indicate a gathering infection.
Therefore, loculation of the radioactive tracer within an abdominal collection suggests pseudocyst formation.
Cyst formation may be the result of hemorrhage or necrosis, fluid secretion from the meningioma, or loculation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).
Tuberculosis can also be considered when the omental cake occurs in conjunction with other imaging features, such as ascites with adhesions/septations and loculation, peritoneal and mesenteric thickening, bowel wall thickening, lymphadenopathy, and stigmata of TB in the chest.
Additional pleural CT appearance features such as loculation, pleural thickening and nodules are not reliable in differentiating exudates from tansudates, although their prevalence is higher among exudative effusion.
8 cm in size with evidence of peripheral wall calcification and loculation extending from pelvis to epigastrium.
Table 3: Imaging features of cystic masses US Appearance Lymphangioma Branchial Cyst ECHOGENECITY Hypoechoic - + Anechoic + + Fluid-Fluid level - + POSTERIOR ENHANCEMENT + + ATTENUATION (10-25 HU) + + RIM ENHANCEMENT - + LOCULATION + - CALCIFICATION - -
Open drainage allow complete evacuation of pleural fluid by debridement and disruption of all loculations which is necessary for full lung expansion and resolution of infection.