locoweed


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Related to locoweed: purple locoweed

locoweed

(lō′kō-wēd′)
n.
Any of several leguminous plants of the genera Oxytropis and Astragalus of western North America that are poisonous to livestock. Also called crazyweed, loco1.

locoweed

(lō′kō-wēd)
A poisonous plant from the bean family that causes behavioral, visual, and gait disturbances, usually in cattle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Analysis of swainsonine; extraction methods, detection, and measurement in populations of locoweeds (Oxytropis spp.).
Locoweed (Astragalus lentiginosus) poisoning in cattle and horses.
James at the ARS Poisonous Plants Laboratory in Logan, Utah, pinpointed swainsonine as the culprit in locoweed poisonings about 10 years ago.
It was used to study glucoprotein N-link oligosaccharide as an instrument drug, since it was separated initially from the fruit of Australian Swainsona canescens and North America locoweed (including Astragalus and Oxytropis spp.) (Li et al., 2004; Douglas et al., 2005; Guetens et al., 2002; William et al., 2001).
On the other hand, while selenium is accumulated by asters, Machaeranthera, Atriplex, Oonopsis and some species of Astragalus (milkvetch), there are some plants which are obligated to accumulate it -- they need it: Stanleya (Princesplume), Xylorrhiza (woody aster) and Astragalus mollissimun (locoweed).
Larkspur, like pine needles, locoweed, lupine, and a host of other plants found in western pastures, contains toxins that can poison unwitting, hungry livestock.
Milkweed, wild cherry, locoweed, and others should be avoided.
More than 100 species of locoweed grow in New Mexico.
Plants in this genus are economically significant as a source of gum tragacanth, as indicators of selenium and uranium and as toxic locoweeds in rangelands (Allen and Allen, 1981).
Plants in this genus are amazingly diverse, some are nourishing and medicinal, some useful as raw materials, and others, such as the locoweeds, are toxic.