locomotor

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locomotor

 [lo″ko-mo´tor]
of or pertaining to locomotion.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lo·co·mo·tor

(lō'kō-mō'tŏr),
Relating to locomotion, or movement from one place to another.
Synonym(s): locomotive, locomotory
[L. locus, place, + L. moveo, pp. motus, to move]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lo·co·mo·tor

(lō'kō-mō'tŏr)
Relating to locomotion, or movement from one place to another.
[L. locus, place, + L. moveo, pp. motus, to move]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

locomotor

Pertaining to the function of voluntary movement.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, nicotine-exposed male and female mice showed suppressed locomotory activity and equilibrium reflex.
The ontogeny of muscle structure and locomotory function in the long-finned squid Doryteuthis pealeii.
The observed difference in the maximum velocities of greenlip abalone between studies may have been due to reduced locomotory capacity of the larger abalone with increasing size (Tutschulte & Connell 1988).
This study showed that agonistic, locomotory, and drinking behaviors were higher on day 1 after mixing in both the control and treatment groups.
Unlike other terrestrial mammals, gliding squirrels depend on gliding locomotion and though it is an effective locomotory mode in forest, they cannot cross forest gaps beyond their gliding capacity (Asari et al.
(2012) suggested that the conceptual understanding provided by a typology helps analysts to accurately recognize the functional role of locomotory actions.
A guide covering some general information on methods for qualitative and quantitative assessment of the behavioral responses of fish (locomotory activity feeding and social responses) during standard laboratory toxicity tests to measure the sublethal effects of exposure to chemical substances were determined as described by ASTM ( 2008).
of the Ohesaare Formation is interpreted here as a locomotory feeding trace (repichnia), presumably formed by an arthropod which excavated sediments by scarping its endopodites towards its midline.
These categories were stationary body positions, locomotory patterns, maintenance behaviours, explorative behaviours, defensive behaviours, reproductive/social behaviours, and others.
It has often been stated that the plastron and the large spatulate spines are the main locomotory structure [5, 9].