lock-out

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lock-out

(lok′owt″)
In biomedical engineering and computer science, a forcing function that limits access to computer software, medications, or supplies unless the user performs a required sequence of actions, such as entering a unique access code.
References in periodicals archive ?
0 allow our clients to quickly determine which lockouts are innocent user error and which ones are suspicious and warrant investigation, said Ryan Morris, Sr.
The United Football League (UFL) is seeking to bank on the potential NFL lockout.
Accordingly, this paper sets out (i) to examine the relation, if any, between recent labour market reform and lockouts in New Zealand and (ii) to compare New Zealand experience with that of Australia.
The improper hiring strengthened Ralphs financially and helped it survive the lengthy lockout while the unions saw their resources drained, prosecutors said.
It very much depends whether your name, Lockouts of Westcliff, is a registered trademark or whether it's a limited company.
There may not be much of a difference in whether the labor dispute with the West Coast dockworkers is defined as a strike or a lockout.
Most companies, including those that try to plan for every contingency, do not have well-ordered plans for managing the operational, security, and logistical problems safe or vault lockouts can cause.
Iso-lok's new ball valve lockout allows valves to be locked in either an open or closed position.
Recent research by Briggs (2004a; 2004b; 2004c; 2005) has thrown light on the number of lockouts in Australia during the decade ended 2003.
WILMINGTON - The visions of a lockout at the ports 15 months ago are still fresh in the minds of dock workers in Long Beach and Los Angeles.
In the June 2004 edition of this Journal, Briggs (2004a) presented new information on lockouts in Australia.
The fees can range from $2,500 to $15,000 per day and aren't automatically waived because of lockouts, said John Holloway, a maritime law attorney in Norfolk, Va.