lock-in


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Related to lock-in: Lock-in amplifier, lock-in period

lock-in

(lok′in″)
1. In a health care insurance plan, a provision that requires that the insured party receive all health care services from providers who participate in the plan.
2. In biomedical engineering, a forcing function that requires that certain actions be undertaken in a specified sequence to avoid mishaps or errors.
References in periodicals archive ?
The scavenger hunt allows teens at all participating libraries on the night of the lock-in to form teams and create photos from a list of theme-related poses.
One clear example of this is that today's undocumented migrants undertake lock-ins in churches to demand the granting of residency documents.
Lenders complain that lock-ins have become too much like options.
PC James Johnson's report claimed people were "snorting cocaine" during a 5am lock-in for Floyd Mayweather's August fight with Conor McGregor.
This prompts consumers to be more aware of a fall in rates after they lock-in a mortgage.
Pelly and Harry were reported to have attended lock-ins at the Rattlebone Inn in Sherston, Wiltshire, and also to have smoked drugs together.
Removing most extended lock-ins and fees has been particularl successful in attracting new business.'
It offers a glimpse into a seedy underworld of lock-ins at paramilitaryrun pubs and drink and drug-fuelled house parties where young people are used for sex, sometimes by more than one man.
Staff running stations in Aston, Sutton Coldfield and St Paul's Square in the city centre were forced to approve "lock-ins" as 10pm approached, ushering in voters and closing the doors behind them.
That said, my mother and grandmother before her ran the place with soft humour but an iron fist, not allowing swearing in her company, bad behaviour, gambling or late-night lock-ins.
Some shops also after-hours 'lock-ins' with 20pc off and free drinks;