lochia

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lochia

 [lo´ke-ah]
a vaginal discharge occurring after childbirth. Lochia discharge should be checked every 15 minutes for the first hour after delivery, once every hour for the first 8 hours, and then every 8 hours. adj., adj lo´chial.
lochia al´ba the final vaginal discharge after childbirth, largely mucus, when the amount of blood is decreased and the leukocytes are increased; it is usually of 10 to 14 days' duration but may last for 6 weeks.
lochia cruen´ta lochia rubra.
lochia purulen´ta lochia alba.
lochia ru´bra that occurring immediately after childbirth, consisting of blood, fragments of decidua, and mucus. It usually lasts from 1 to 3 days.
lochia sanguinolen´ta (lochia sero´sa) the vaginal discharge occurring 3 to 10 days after delivery. It is pink or brown-tinged and contains blood, mucus, and leukocytes.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lo·chi·a

(lō'kē-ă),
Discharges from the vagina of mucus, blood, and tissue debris, following childbirth.
[G. neut. pl. of lochios, relating to childbirth, fr. lochos, childbirth]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lochia

(lō′kē-ə, lŏk′ē-ə)
pl.n. Medicine
The normal uterine discharge of blood, tissue, and mucus from the vagina after childbirth.

lo′chi·al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

lo·chi·a

(lō'kē-ă)
Discharge from the vagina of mucus, blood, and tissue debris, following childbirth.
[G. neut. pl. of lochios, relating to childbirth, fr. lochos, childbirth]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lochia

The discharge of blood, mucus and particles of tissue from the womb, mainly coming from site of the afterbirth (PLACENTA), during the first 2 or 3 weeks after birth. The discharge is red for the first 3 or 4 days and usually disappears by about the tenth day. Offensive-smelling lochia suggests infection and is a danger sign.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005