lobular carcinoma


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Related to lobular carcinoma: lobular carcinoma in situ

lob·u·lar car·ci·no·ma

a form of adenocarcinoma, especially of the breast, where lobular carcinoma is less common than ductal carcinoma and usually is composed of small cells.

lobular carcinoma

Oncology A major morphologic form of  breast carcinoma which, like ductal breast carcinoma, arises in the terminal duct/lobular unit; the division is of morphologic, but no clinical, significance. Cf Ductal carcinoma, Medullary carcinoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
E-cadherin expression in pleomorphic lobular carcinoma: An aid to differentiation from ductal carcinoma.
Lobular carcinoma in situ represents both a risk factor and a nonobligate precursor for the development of invasive carcinoma in either breast.
Invasive lobular carcinoma is generally believed to have an increased propensity for bilateral disease.
At our institution, patients with low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ, lobular carcinoma in situ, atypical ductal hyperplasia, or atypical lobular hyperplasia in RMP specimens were offered "high-risk" screening and in some cases, prophylactic hormonal treatment.
A study concluded that in patients younger than 30 years, careful gross examination with or without minimal microscopic examination (1 or 2 blocks) were adequate.12 Extensive microscopic examination in specimens from women over 40 years was recommended even in the absence of grossly evident lesions.12 By using this method, it determined 8% lobular carcinoma in situ in the series.
MR Imaging of the breast in patients with invasive lobular carcinoma. AJR Am J Roentgenology.
The diagnosis and management of pre-invasive breast disease: pathology of atypical lobular hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ.
Esserman and colleagues (13) found that in 2 cases of "diffuse" ALH/LCIS (defined as greater than 1 lobule per core involved by ALH/LCIS) diagnosed at core needle biopsy, invasive lobular carcinoma was found at excision in both cases.
"High risk" was defined as being age 65 or older with one first-degree relative with breast cancer, being age 45 or older with more than one first-degree relative with breast cancer or one first-degree relative younger than 50 who developed breast cancer, age 40 or older with a first-degree relative with bilateral breast cancer, or being diagnosed with atypical ductal or lobular hyperplasia or lobular carcinoma in situ on a prior biopsy.
Proliferative lesions with atypia include fat atypia, atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) and lobular neoplasia (atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH), lobular carcinoma in situ) (12).
A comparison of the metastatic pattern of infiltrating lobular carcinoma and infiltrating duct carcinoma of the breast.
If cancer develops from the glands, it is called lobular carcinoma. While if it occurs in the canals of the breast it is known as ductal carcinoma.1 Worldwide, breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in adult females.