lobular carcinoma


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to lobular carcinoma: lobular carcinoma in situ

lob·u·lar car·ci·no·ma

a form of adenocarcinoma, especially of the breast, where lobular carcinoma is less common than ductal carcinoma and usually is composed of small cells.

lobular carcinoma

[lob′yələr]
Etymology: Gk, lobos + karkinos, crab, oma, tumor
a neoplasm that often forms a diffuse mass and accounts for a small percentage of breast tumors. It occurs in the milk lobes of the breast.
enlarge picture
Lobular carcinoma

lobular carcinoma

Oncology A major morphologic form of  breast carcinoma which, like ductal breast carcinoma, arises in the terminal duct/lobular unit; the division is of morphologic, but no clinical, significance. Cf Ductal carcinoma, Medullary carcinoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Results of excisional biopsies showed 1 case of invasive lobular carcinoma and 1 intraductal papilloma.
prior diagnosis of atypia or lobular carcinoma in situ;
A case report: lobular carcinoma in situ in a male patient with subsequent invasive ductal carcinoma identified on screening breast MRI.
Even though there are a few case reports of lobular carcinoma metastasizing to the rectum, there are only 3 case reports in the literature of invasive ductal carcinoma metastasizing to the rectum till date (3-5).
Risk factors for breast cancer include increased mammographic density [46], previous breast cancer [47], a family history of breast cancer [48], genetic mutations; BRCA1 /BRCA2 [49], TP53 (Li-Fraumeni Syndrome) and PTEN Cowden and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndromes [50], a biopsy-proven diagnosis of atypia [51], lobular carcinoma in situ [52], radial scar [53] and previous mantle radiation for Hodgkin's disease (HD) [54,55].
Atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) and atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH) may also present with calcifications which may exhibit high density, clustered punctuate calcification and tend to lack the characteristic features of DCIS such as rod shapes, ductal distribution and branching.
Invasive ductal carcinoma is the most common histological type, accounting for 70 - 80% of cases, while invasive lobular carcinoma is the second most common, accounting for 5 - 10% of cases.
These include patients with known BRCA mutations or those who have previously undergone chest radiation therapy, because of the associated increased risk of contralateral breast cancer; patients with dense breast tissue on mammography, a strong family history of breast cancer absent a genetic mutation, or lobular carcinoma in situ; and patients who are not good candidates for breast-conserving surgery because of tumor size, multiple tumors, or contraindications for breast radiotherapy, he said.
Women with ductal carcinoma in situ or lobular carcinoma in situ were excluded.
There were no false-negative cases of metastatic lobular carcinoma in this group.
Abnormalities (such as lobular carcinoma in situ, atypical ductal hyperplasia, and other precancerous lesions) may demonstrate MRI enhancement.