lobular capillary hemangioma


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Related to lobular capillary hemangioma: granuloma pyogenicum, pyogenic granuloma

py·o·gen·ic gran·u·lo·ma

, granuloma pyogenicum
an acquired small rounded mass of highly vascular granulation tissue, frequently with an ulcerated surface, projecting from the skin, especially of the face, or oral mucosa; histologically, the mass is a lobular capillary hemangioma.

py·o·gen·ic gran·u·lo·ma

, granuloma pyogenicum (pī'ō-jen'ik gran'yū-lō'mă, pī-ō-jen'i-kŭm)
An acquired small, rounded mass of highly vascular granulation tissue, frequently with an ulcerated surface, projecting from the skin or mucosa; histologically, the mass resembles a capillary hemangioma.
Synonym(s): lobular capillary hemangioma.

lobular capillary hemangioma

A fleshy, polyp-shaped hemangioma that may develop at the site of a wound. It bleeds easily and is usually tender.
See also: hemangioma
References in periodicals archive ?
CT features of lobular capillary hemangioma of the nasal cavity.
Nasal lobular capillary hemangiomas (LCHs) are rare, (1) rapidly growing hypervascular benign lesions whose exact etiopathogenesis is unknown.
A Rare Cause of Resistant Epistaxis: Lobular Capillary Hemangioma Arising from the Inferior Turbinate.
Mulliken, "Pyogenic granuloma (lobular capillary hemangioma): a clinicopathologic study of 178 cases," Pediatric Dermatology, vol.
The present case diagnosed as Lobular Capillary Hemangioma (pyogenic granuloma) is a proliferative vascular lesion often clinically confused with hemangioma.
Jagdeesh, "Nasal lobular capillary hemangioma," Journal of Clinical Imaging Science, vol.
Lobular capillary hemangioma (LCH), also referred to as pyogenic granuloma, is relatively common in the nasal cavity, accounting for nearly one-third of upper aerodigestive tract LCHs.
Intravenous pyogenic granuloma or intra venous lobular capillary hemangioma. Skeletal Radiol.
The clinical and imaging differential diagnosis of a nasal mass should include hemangioma, malignant vascular tumor (angiosarcoma), pyogenic granuloma (lobular capillary hemangioma), nasal polyp, and hamartoma.
Pathologic examination revealed that the mass was a lobular capillary hemangioma that was marked by extensive ulceration, hemorrhage, and necrosis.
Capillary hemangiomas of the CNS are very rare and show histological features similar to those of lobular capillary hemangiomas of the skin as well as the capillary hemangiomas of infancy, (46) with a fibrous pseudocapsule.
A "hemangiopericytoma-like" pattern can be found in a wide array of neoplasms of divergent differentiation (e.g., lobular capillary hemangiomas, angiofibromas, meningiomas, and leiomyomas), but the characteristic histologic and immunophenotypic features allow for separation.