lobotomy


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lobotomy

 [lo-bot´ah-me]
a form of psychosurgery consisting of cutting of nerve fibers connecting a lobe of the brain with the thalamus. In most cases the affected parts are the prefrontal or frontal lobes, the areas of the brain involved with emotion; thus the operation is referred to as prefrontal or frontal lobotomy. Once fairly common as a method of controlling violent behavior, in recent decades its use has become rare because of the development of medications for treatment of severe mental illness, such as the antipsychotics that suppress violent symptoms of psychosis.

lo·bot·o·my

(lō-bot'ŏ-mē),
1. Incision into a lobe.
2. Division of one or more nerve tracts in a lobe of the cerebrum.
[G. lobos, lobe, + tomē, a cutting]

lobotomy

/lo·bot·o·my/ (lo-bot´ah-me) incision of a lobe; in psychosurgery, incision of all the fibers of a lobe of the brain.
frontal lobotomy , prefrontal lobotomy incision of the white matter of the frontal lobe with a leukotome passed via a cannula through holes drilled in the skull.

lobotomy

(lə-bŏt′ə-mē, lō-)
n. pl. loboto·mies
Surgical incision into the frontal lobe of the brain to sever one or more nerve tracts, a technique formerly used to treat certain mental disorders but now rarely performed.

lobotomy

[lōbot′əmē]
Etymology: Gk, lobos + temnein, to cut
a neurosurgical procedure (craniotomy) in which the nerve fibers in the bundle of white matter in the frontal lobe of the brain are severed to interrupt the transmission of various affective responses. Severe intractable depression and pain are among the indications for the operation. It is seldom performed, because it has many unpredictable and undesirable effects, including personality change, aggression, socially unacceptable behavior, incontinence, apathy, and lack of consideration for others. Because lobotomy is simple to perform, it was overused in the treatment of mentally ill patients in the past. A cannula is passed through the bony orbit of the eye, and a wire loop is inserted through the cannula to the cingulum. The nerve fibers are severed with the wire loop. Also called leukotomy.

lo·bot·o·my

(lō-bot'ǒ-mē)
1. Incision into a lobe.
2. Division of one or more nerve tracts in a lobe of the cerebrum.
[G. lobos, lobe, + tomē, a cutting]

lobotomy (l·bäˑ·t·mēˈ),

n an infrequently performed surgical separation of the nerve fibers that connect the thalamus to the frontal lobes. This procedure is typically used in the treatment of certain mental disorders, such as severe depression. Also called
leukotomy.

lobotomy

cutting of nerve fibers connecting a lobe of the brain with the thalamus. In most cases the affected parts are the prefrontal or frontal lobes; thus the operation is referred to as prefrontal, or frontal, lobotomy. Performed in humans as a form of psychosurgery. It has been applied in dogs for the treatment of aggressive behavior, but is of limited usefulness.
References in periodicals archive ?
At its strongest points, White Matter is not the history of lobotomy as told through the story of a family, but the story of a family, as told in part through the history of lobotomy.
This first American lobotomy took place as Moniz began to publish, and it would be Freeman who would be responsible for the medical community outside Italy and Portugal showing any interest in this procedure (Kalinowsky, Hippius, and Klein 1982:272-293).
Quebec singing star Alys Robi has spiralled downward into a mental hospital where she is about to undergo a lobotomy, deemed the only cure for her violent bouts of manic depression Awaiting surgery, Alys recalls the life and meteoric show-biz career that led her to this traumatic moment.
1895-1972), is one of the most reviled physicians of the 20th century, but from the 1930s through the 1950s he was celebrated, showered with awards, and featured on the covers of magazines, all for his single-minded advocacy of frontal lobotomy as an almost universal cure for a wide variety of mental illnesses.
Incidentally, I'd go for the lobotomy over the sex change - spot the difference, I say.
The lobotomy literature is filled with references to how the husband says the wife is 'better than ever' now that she has brain damage.
Jim (please go away again) Allister, Martin (zzzz) Morgan, Bairbre (get the garlic) de Brun and Jim (hide and seek champ) Nicholson are like four lobotomy patients at a stupid contest.
Reflected Architecture announces an endgame: "Instruments of design have become as sharp as lancets and as sensitive as sounding lines, we can use them for a delicate lobotomy.
In a scene recalling Jack Nicholson after his lobotomy in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, she shuffles back, beaten and dejected, into the laundry room to resume her work.
From Thalidomide to lobotomy to today's reconsideration of hormone replacement therapy, we repeatedly discard the previous day's genius.
Insulin-induced coma, lobotomy, and electroshock were still accepted treatments for schizophrenia, and Thorazine was initially praised for producing "an effect similar to frontal lobotomy.
And I need more information about how teams of experts interacted in deciding who needed a lobotomy in the 1950s (pp.