lobbying

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lobbying

Attempting to shape legislation, influence legislators, or mold public opinion.

lobbying,

n the act of influencing, by argumentation, the course of action of a legislator.
References in periodicals archive ?
Under the heading, "Production Aspects: Lobby Techniques and Finances," Terry presents a thoroughly professional assessment of lobbies in the U.
With a big enough package and a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, the broad electorate can, in principle, be mobilized against a collection of narrow lobbies.
That has led to an examination of new ways to mitigate damage and loss from building fires, including mandates to provide enclosed elevator lobbies.
But as the Hmong and many other groups recognized that the federal government was abdicating policy toward smaller states, they seized the opportunity to set up powerful lobbies.
When environmentalists lobby more, business lobbies more, and vice versa.
com's cutting-edge communications technologies, including text chat, pager, and live voice chat -- which is featured in chat and game lobbies in as well as during game play.
Visitor Link kiosks in building lobbies connect via the Internet to a secure centralized Kastle database.
He calls instead for devolving more federal programs to the states, so that lobbies would have to disperse their influence around the country, and for competition for federal programs, like vouchers in education.
Although these groups do provide community services, they also seek to advance political agendas: Planned Parenthood lobbies for tax-subsidized abortions; the Interfaith Peace Resource Council advocates nuclear disarmament.
It adds cachet to the lobbies and public spaces of office buildings where office space is available for lease," notes Edward Aretz, Esq.
Although he can't resist the urge to call military contractors "merchants of death" and anti-regulatory lobbies "the forces of darkness," he leavens his indignation with a welcome dash of mischievous humor ("Congress: Training Grounds for Real Jobs").
Formerly serving as mere entryways to tenant space, lobbies now command much of the spotlight in buildings, acting as both social and cultural destinations for the public as well as building occupants.