lixiviation


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lixiviation

 [lik-siv″e-a´shun]
separation of soluble from insoluble material by use of an appropriate solvent, and drawing off the solution.

lixiviation

/lix·iv·i·a·tion/ (lik-siv″e-a´shun) separation of soluble from insoluble material by use of an appropriate solvent, and drawing off the solution.

lixiviation

See leaching.

lixiviation

separation of soluble from insoluble material by use of an appropriate solvent, and drawing off the solution.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lead contamination could be explained in addition to minerals lixiviation process, as result of the uranium natural degradation present in the studied region (CPRM, 2014; Geras'kin et al.
Using this, it is possible to postulate that the present study area presented concentration values corresponding to the accumulation of glacier erosion and natural lixiviation of the rocks that form the geological landscape.
It is not uncommon to hear a taxi driver speak about the low standards of mining regulations, or to see graffiti or street art alluding to cyanide or to the process of lixiviation.
The lixiviation of metals from soils using selective extractants gives valuable information, especially for agricultural purposes.
This might be attributed to lixiviation of bases from the mineralization of the litter.
Even though the latter was prepared mixing 20% of diethyl ether in water and adding an emulsification agent, disks underwent dehydration, pigment lixiviation and a slight corrugation, which could turn tissues less edible to H.
On the other hand, the total lack of local water required for the lixiviation of crude sodium nitrate led to its extraction from the Loa River and from wells built with the new British technology.
The company removes the least stable compounds responsible for heavy metal lixiviation and segregates the ferrites into different pigment grades that are suitable for different formulations and coating applications.
High phosphate levels in superficial and groundwater may also be related to decomposition of organic material, discharge of industrial or domestic wastewater, residues of lixiviation of minerals, natural degradation processes, use of fertilizers and detergents, presence of animal excreta, residues of insecticides, herbicides, chemical fertilizers, and limestone, among other compounds (9, 10 ,11).
Species with high C/N ratio, as happens with Erica and Cistus species, release less N, and according to Hart and Firestone (1989) and Soltner (1990) nitrogen is partially lost by lixiviation.
Simultaneously with the decrease in the influx of carbonate products by surface and subsurface waters as a result of considerable lixiviation of till layers, carbonate balance in lake water was disturbed: oversaturation was replaced by undersaturation and the stage of Si[O.