living will


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Related to living will: living trust, Durable power of attorney

will

 [wil]
a legal declaration of a person's wishes, usually regarding disposal of possessions after the person has died.
living will advance directives.

living will

(liv'ing wil),
an advance directive that specifies the types of care a person does or does not want to receive in the event of becoming mentally incompetent during the course of a terminal illness, or becoming permanently comatose. A document that names another person to make such decisions is known as a durable power-of-attorney for health care decisions. An advance directive can contain both types of instruction. See: advance directive.

living will

n.
A document in which the signer states his or her wishes regarding medical treatment that sustains or prolongs life, especially by invasive or extraordinary means, for use if the signer becomes mentally incompetent or unable to communicate.

living will

Etymology: AS, libben + willa, wish
1 an advance declaration by a patient that, if determined to be hopelessly and terminally ill, the patient does not want to be connected to life support equipment. See also durable power of attorney for health care.
2 a written agreement between a patient and physician to withhold heroic measures if the patient's condition is found to be irreversible. See also advance directive.
A statement made by an adult at a time when he/she has the capacity to decide for himself/herself about the treatments he/she wishes to accept or refuse, in circumstances in the future when he/she is no longer able to make decisions or communicate his/her preferences

living will

Right to die An advance medical directive in which a mentally-competent adult formally expresses his/her preferences regarding medical treatment, in the event of future incapacitation or incompetence to make medical decisions. See Advance directive, DNR, Health care proxy. Cf Durable powers of attorney, Euthanasia.

liv·ing will

(liv'ing wil)
Legal document used to indicate one's preference to die rather than be sustained artificially if sick or injured beyond the prospect of recovery.
See: advance directive
Synonym(s): durable power of attorney (2) .

living will

A document requesting and directing what should be done in the event of a person's later inability to express his or her wishes on medical management. The purpose is usually to try to ensure that exceptional measures are not taken to maintain life in the event of a terminal illness. The respecting of such a will has long been accepted in most States in the USA and has, since January 1998, also been a statutory right in Britain. The term refers to the fact that the writer's deposition may be enacted when he or she is still living. The Voluntary Euthanasia Society has recently produced a new draft will that also provides an opportunity for the patient to express the desire to be kept alive for as long as is reasonably possible.

liv·ing will

(liv'ing wil)
Advance directive that specifies the types of care a person does or does not want to receive in the event of becoming mentally incompetent during the course of a terminal illness, or becoming permanently comatose. A document that may also name another person to make such decisions is known as a durable power-of-attorney for health care decisions. An advance directive can contain both types of instruction.

Patient discussion about living will

Q. do we need the esophagus to live? If we were to take our esophagus away would we still live?

A. Principally, yes. Feeding can be done through a hole in the stomach (PEG). Life is possible this way, although one may argue about the quality of life in this situation.

Q. How long can an alcoholic expect to live? My nephew who was an alcoholic died in his early age of 35. My uncle who was also an alcoholic died in his age of 48. How long can an alcoholic expect to live?

A. I am sorry. My dad who is an alcoholic too always advice me from his experience that an alcoholic will die younger than they would if they were not using alcohol. There are two sides to this: physiological and psychological. The destructive effect that alcohol has on the human body when used to excess may shorten expected lifespan. This list is long, from brain damage to liver failure.
The psychological side is the likelihood that goofy behavior caused by the use of alcohol may kill them. The list here is endless. Driving while drunk, getting in violent confrontations, taking idiotic risks, using power tools while blitzed. One way or another, the odds are good that this person will die much earlier than if they were not drinking.

Q. how long do u live with lupus? why do we get lupus? why was i hit with it along with all my other medical problems? i dont understand why..

A. well i've had it now for 1 yr and i'm still going

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References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, issues remain regarding the effect of living will requirements on foreign-based institutions.
A living will is an effective way to gain peace of mind about what will take place should you become unable to vouch for yourself.
The living will is also an instrument used in preserving patient autonomy in the event of incapacity.
A simplistic endorsement of living wills perpetuates a flawed and incomplete approach to a serious human problem.
The introduction of legallybinding living wills has prompted fears of euthanasia.
The Voluntary Euthanasia Society offers its own version of a living will, copies of which are available by telephoning the VES on 0207 937 7770.
For the analysis, published in the July issue of Health Affairs, researchers reviewed 150 studies published from 2011 to 2016 that reported on the proportion of adults who completed advance directives, focusing on living wills and health care power-of-attorney documents.
Given these costs, shareholders considering the creation of living wills would need to evaluate the savings in financing costs that a good living will was likely to bring about.
A living will is only utilized if you are too ill to make medical care decisions yourself, and you can revoke yours at any time, both orally and in writing," Barton says.
Like many advanced directives, the WV living will requires patients to make the same broad care decisions for a terminal condition or a persistent vegetative state.
For those in the early stages of a serious illness, the progression of which is known, a living will can provide vital help and advice to loved ones at a time when they need it the most.
Given today's societal demands, there is a clear need for patients to create a living will, which is a document designed to enforce a patient's rights to respect for his or her personality, human dignity, privacy and personal autonomy, as well as confidentiality in the handling of his or her clinical history (1).