lived experience

lived experience

(lĭvd)
The subjective perception of one's experience of health or illness. Associated with Rosemarie Parse's Nursing Theory of Human becoming, universal lived experiences are people's perceptions of their personal health-related experiences.
References in periodicals archive ?
The research projects presented in this book, such as the lived experience of lesbian women in gynaecological services, and the experience of women with severe pre-eclampsia, help reveal a world often concealed from us in practice.
brings lived experience with trauma and over 20 years as a professional consultant in adult learning and organizational change to Risking Connection.
As a process, recovery can been described as the lived experience of personal growth and search for meaning after the onset of mental illness.
This they suggested would help them with any future excursions they undertook with grounded theory as they would have a more informed and corporeal understanding of the nature of the lived experience.
Although Hsiung's style is idiosyncratic, and although the book contains errors of Romanization and a few infelicitous translations, her poignant examples capture nuance and evoke sentiments that bring us face to face with lived experience, offering a vital counterpoint to the prescriptive texts she analyzes so deftly.
The strength of this book lies in its unflagging attention to nuance and its reliance on lived experience.
The added time and effort required to use courseware does not guarantee the creation of authentic learning contexts--teaching that is grounded in students' own lived experience and concern for the larger world of which they are a part (O' Hair, McLaughlin, & Reitzug, 2000).
While significant portions of the dialog feel stilted, The Roman Conspiracy does convey the lived experience of this ancient culture through descriptive scenes and settings.
His lived experience with the subject allows him to write lucidly and effortlessly but not in an intimidating way.
The interplay of diverse but connected works set off a series of ricocheting slippages, not only between art and commercial illustration but between fiction and actuality, pictorial and architectural space, erotics and intellect, history and lived experience.
Considerable emphasis is given to the unique struggle of being a woman, and how this struggle affects lived experience womanist theology is presented as a possible way to engage the prevailing and limiting attitudes of the day.
But like Gordon (whose book builds on Fanon's insight of "the lived experience of the black"), Hogue affirms that the reality of people who experience life "as black subalterns" and as "racial Others" confirms the common devaluation that "blacks" share.