litter

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lit·ter

(lit'ĕr),
1. A stretcher or portable couch for moving the sick or injured.
2. A group of animals of the same parents, born at the same time. Synonym(s): brood (1)
[Fr. litière; fr. lit, bed]

litter

/lit·ter/ (lit´er) stretcher.

litter

(lĭt′ər)
n.
1. The group of offspring produced at one birth by a mammal.
2. A flat supporting framework, such as a piece of canvas stretched between parallel shafts, for carrying a disabled or dead person; a stretcher.
v. lit·tered, lit·tering, lit·ters
v.tr.
1. To give birth to (a litter).
2. To make untidy by discarding rubbish carelessly: Someone had littered the beach with food wrappers.
3. To scatter about: littered towels all over the locker room.
4. To be scattered about (an area): "A lot of torn envelopes and open letters littered his bed" (Joseph Conrad).
5. To include certain items such as expressions throughout (a speech or piece of writing, for example): littered his letters with the names of powerful friends.
6. Archaic To supply (animals) with litter for bedding or floor covering.
v.intr.
1. To give birth to a litter.
2. To scatter litter.

lit′ter·er n.

litter

Etymology: Fr, lit, bed
a stretcher.

litter

Military medicine A mobile bed for transporting wounded military personnel Vox populi Trash strewn in a public or open place

lit·ter

(lit'ĕr)
1. A stretcher or portable couch for moving the sick or injured.
2. A group of animals of the same parents, born at the same time.
[Fr. litière; fr. lit, bed]

litter

  1. any material aggregated on the surface of soil from above-ground vegetation.
  2. the offspring produced at any one time by a mammal.

litter

1. the group of neonates, products of one gestation, provided the average number is in excess of two.
2. dry particulate material used for bedding or as absorptive layer under animals or periodically by the animal to absorb urine and dry out feces. Dry litter system for poultry and litter for cats to use for urination and defecation while indoors.

litter size
the number of young in a litter is an important statistic in pigs because of the need to maximize the output of piglets per sow per year.
litter tray
the container, usually broad with low sides, that holds some absorbent material; used by indoor cats for urination and defecation.
References in periodicals archive ?
elevation of body weight was statistically significant after adjustment for litter size (p = 0.
Kids weights at various ages (birth, 30, 60, 90 and 120 days) as influenced by breed, body condition score, season, sex, litter size and parity are shown in Table 2.
Due to a female's habit of cannibalizing young at birth and the superimposed distribution of young on her dorsum, an accurate litter size was difficult to obtain.
Likewise, the mean body mass of ungulates differed according to the observed litter size (F = 13.
And at 12 weeks of age, when the rabbits are segregated for either slaughter or future breeding, the effect of litter size is still apparent.
1999), however, recently found no effect of inbreeding on juvenile survival and litter size in captive Mexican wolves.
Key words: Sylvilagus aquaticus, swamp rabbit, reproduction, nests, litter size.
We maintained live females in the laboratory until parturition, which increased the number of lizards that could be examined from each study population and allowed us to assess variation in traits such as litter size, relative litter mass, and size of offspring within as well as between these populations.
Because of global concerns of cellular phone application during pregnancy and relative scientific debates, aim of this study was to determination of hazardous effects of exposure to cell phones EMF at pre- or during pregnancy on litter size and sex-ratio as important reproductive traits.
SO CUTE: Betty and Georgina with some of Ethel and Bertie's bizarre mixed litter SIZE CAN MATTER: Betty with Ethel's son Ronnie and dad Bertie
RESULTS: Maternal TCDD exposure resulted in reduced litter size in D2 mice and, on HFD, reduced postpartum survival in B6 mice.