litter


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lit·ter

(lit'ĕr),
1. A stretcher or portable couch for moving the sick or injured.
2. A group of animals of the same parents, born at the same time. Synonym(s): brood (1)
[Fr. litière; fr. lit, bed]

litter

/lit·ter/ (lit´er) stretcher.

litter

(lĭt′ər)
n.
1. The group of offspring produced at one birth by a mammal.
2. A flat supporting framework, such as a piece of canvas stretched between parallel shafts, for carrying a disabled or dead person; a stretcher.
v. lit·tered, lit·tering, lit·ters
v.tr.
1. To give birth to (a litter).
2. To make untidy by discarding rubbish carelessly: Someone had littered the beach with food wrappers.
3. To scatter about: littered towels all over the locker room.
4. To be scattered about (an area): "A lot of torn envelopes and open letters littered his bed" (Joseph Conrad).
5. To include certain items such as expressions throughout (a speech or piece of writing, for example): littered his letters with the names of powerful friends.
6. Archaic To supply (animals) with litter for bedding or floor covering.
v.intr.
1. To give birth to a litter.
2. To scatter litter.

lit′ter·er n.

litter

Etymology: Fr, lit, bed
a stretcher.

litter

Military medicine A mobile bed for transporting wounded military personnel Vox populi Trash strewn in a public or open place

lit·ter

(lit'ĕr)
1. A stretcher or portable couch for moving the sick or injured.
2. A group of animals of the same parents, born at the same time.
[Fr. litière; fr. lit, bed]

litter

  1. any material aggregated on the surface of soil from above-ground vegetation.
  2. the offspring produced at any one time by a mammal.

litter

1. the group of neonates, products of one gestation, provided the average number is in excess of two.
2. dry particulate material used for bedding or as absorptive layer under animals or periodically by the animal to absorb urine and dry out feces. Dry litter system for poultry and litter for cats to use for urination and defecation while indoors.

litter size
the number of young in a litter is an important statistic in pigs because of the need to maximize the output of piglets per sow per year.
litter tray
the container, usually broad with low sides, that holds some absorbent material; used by indoor cats for urination and defecation.
References in periodicals archive ?
25million Scots drop litter on the streets every year, according to a shock survey.
In places with this worm, the leaf litter was about half the thickness of the cushion in forest spots with no earthworms.
A SORRY scene like this is summed up as "Widespread distribution of litter and refuse with some minor accumulations"
For example, litter often immobilizes nutrients (particularly nitrogen [N] and phosphorus [P]) early during decomposition, suggesting that fresh litter contains insufficient nutrients to meet the growth and maintenance requirements of decomposers (Gosz et al.
24 per litter and the price of kerosene oil was Rs 108.
Nyanko Planet's peach scented tofu litter is customized for longhair cats.
According to the latest National Litter Index Report, cigarette butts continue to be the most littered item in WA - making up 29 per cent of the litter stream.
It is an increase from the previous year when 450 notices were handed out and makes it the fifth worst city in Britain for litter.
Stimulation of foraging behavior during the first weeks of life by increasing environmental complexity such as scattering food items on the litter may be one way of preventing leg disorders, reducing fear, and improving broiler welfare.
People who litter the streets could face increased fixed penalties while the owners of vehicles could be fined if rubbish is thrown from their car by any driver or passenger, under measures being consulted on as part of a national litter strategy.
Since its launch in 2010, the World's Best Cat Litter GiveLitter charity has empowered cat lovers to donate more than 550,000 pounds of free litter to deserving shelters across the country.
Poultry litter (chicken waste, spilled feed, excess feathers, and other poultry-house materials) contains nitrogen and phosphorus, both important crop nutrients.