litigate


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Related to litigate: litigate against

litigate

[lit′əgāt]
(in law) to carry on a suit or to contest.
References in periodicals archive ?
Companies that do well are those that know whether or not they are willing and able to litigate a contested issue.
litigated or settled; for each of Supplement's strategies, litigate and settle, Vitamin paid a lower fine if it settled.
Until we have a way to litigate that when it goes wrong, you don't have equilibrium.
Selecting the appropriate case to litigate begins with a prompt, aggressive, and thorough investigation by the carrier's special investigation unit (SIU).
The issue here is that some of them did not have the opportunity to litigate the wiretap, and the judge wants to make sure everyone has that opportunity,'' Schirn said.
Still, Rubenstein says, "To condition someone's right to litigate on the payment of an unproven amount is unconstitutional.
The work needed to litigate a case is often seen as one task after another, with each task needing completion before one can move on to the next.
Our studies have shown that it often pays for member firms and registered representatives to litigate, rather than settle.
If the taxpayers do not appeal, the IRS will need to find another case to litigate.
In many instances, the IRS would typically litigate similar issues in other circuits, in the hope of creating a conflict between circuits that would improve its chances for Supreme Court review.
6213) lacked the capacity to litigate before the court under Tax Court Rule 60(c), and dismissed the petition.
Roger Proksch, co-founder and President of Asylum Research, commented, "In 2003, faced with numerous high profile sales lost to our MFP-3D[TM], Veeco had a choice to make - innovate or litigate.