lithophone


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lithophone

An obsolete device for identifying concrements (stones) based on reflected sound, a precursor of ultrasonographic instruments.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Hsun stated this succinctly in his judgment of the state of ensemble tuning: [In the past] whenever a musical performance was created, all the timbres (i.e., instrumental sections) took the scale from the bells and lithophones. It is this that comprised a complete correspondence with the pitch-standards.
The installation is also interactive; audience members are invited to play the Lithophone in real time using an electronic piano keyboard positioned at the centre of the instrument.
Apart from ocarinas, flutes and zithers, many huge sets of bell-chimes and lithophones have been found in the tombs of nobles of the Warring States period of the Zhou dynasty (Falkenhausen 1993), of which the most celebrated is a chime of 65 bells from the tomb of the Marquis Yi of Zeng, from the 5th century BC (illus.4).
The yunluo frame of ten pitched gongs became popular only after the 13th century, perhaps a more portable, less exclusive version of the early chimes of bells or lithophones; it is still common in northern ritual ensembles today.
III/5: "Music of the Masses." Idiophones are much in evidence: clay rattles, sistra, lithophones. Approximately sixty percent of all clay rattles are spool-shaped (pl.
The sixty-five bells form a composite set, carefully arranged in a rack, and matched with another rack of thirty-two lithophones (also inscribed).
Musical rocks like those found on the Carn Menyn are known as "lithophones" and have long been associated with the area.
Bagley's essay on them, by far the longest contribution in the book, is as much the centerpiece of this volume as the bells and lithophones themselves are of the instruments excavated at Leigudun.
The first includes aspects of and problems with musical instrument classification systems as they pertain to archaeology; descriptions of musical artifacts in drawings; "excursions" into such musical and sound-making realms as lithophones, cult axes as signaling instruments, rattles for trance enducement, ear plugs as rattles, whistling devices, and synaesthetical imagination; descriptions of photographed artifacts and more "excursions" into Colombian and Venezuelan "sound plates" (ornaments), turtle shell instruments, wooden buzz sticks, a wooden rattle as an expression of a dualistic view of the world, the manner of affixing skins on drums, documentation of a rare stone panpipe known as the "Rawdon syrinx," and so on.