lion

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lion

the largest wild carnivore, yellow, tawny or gray in color; males have a distinctive mane. Called also Panthera leo.

lion jaw
see craniomandibular osteopathy.
mountain lion
a lion-colored, maneless lion. Called also Panthera concolor (syn. Felis concolor), cougar, puma.
lion-tailed macaque
Macaca silenus. See also macaque.
References in periodicals archive ?
While literary lions such as Milan Kundera continued to publish from abroad long after the reasons for their exile had disappeared, those who had stayed through the bad times--most of them contemporaries of Vaclav Havel, born in 1936--found themselves "forced to re-explain the communist period to younger readers who have no persona] memories of political repression.
Many, including a number of literary lions, adored Baudelaire's works.
Keys to the City of Asheville: History: Meet Asheville's Literary Lions.
These qualities drew the handsome, firm-jawed figure into the circle of beautiful actresses, among them Greta Garbo, Ava Gardner and Deborah Kerr; literary lions and movie moguls with hairy chests, most notably the director John Huston and the macho-man himself, Ernest Hemingway.
Its praises have been sung by many literary lions over the years--but we were delighted to learn that others in the business of publishing illustrated history value its qualifies as highly as we do: as you can read on the opposite page, the prize money for our picture researcher of the year award is being donated to the London Library to help it continue in its unique manner.
Roger Lewis is one of the literary lions who will be giving lectures and workshops at the National Academy of Writing.
Here's hoping you're already familiar with living gay literary lions such as Alan Hollinghurst, Felice Picano, Andrew Holleran, Edmund White and others.
Gaseous passages from the works of these literary lions are amusingly performed by Fred Willard, Cheryl Hines, Kevin Nealon, Andrea Martin and Jay Mohr, the last of whom, oddly enough, has written his own self-aggrandizing book, reminding one of the old adage about glass houses and stones.
The reader ambles from place to place with Rifbjerg, meeting the literary lions of the past and present (Tom Kristensen, Villy Sorensen, William Heinesen, Jorgen-Frantz Jacobsen, Thorkild Bjornvig, Tove Ditlevsen), rubbing shoulders with the great and near-great who are sometimes brought down a peg or two by the irreverent Rifbjerg.
Horizon later became home to such literary lions as T.