literature

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lit·er·a·ture

(lit'tĕr-ă-chūr),
1. Body of written work on a specific topic.
2. Colloquial usage indicating any printed matter on a given topic (that is, manufacturer's literature).
[L. literatura, fr. literae, letters, writing]

literature

As used by doctors, the body of information on which the science of medicine is based.

Pronunciation:
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, LITT ruh t’your
Medspeak-US: pronounced, litter ruh churr

lit·er·a·ture

(lit'ĕr-ă-chŭr)
A body of written material.
[L. literatura, fr. literae, letters, writing]

literature,

n the entire body of writings on a given subject.
literature, dental,
n the entire body of writing on dentistry. Most specifically, those writings published following a referee process to validate the scientific discipline in which the writings were produced.
References in periodicals archive ?
Elizabeth McHenry's Forgotten Readers: Recovering the Lost History of African American Literary Societies does exactly what literary and historical scholarship should do: it draws upon foundational scholarship, redresses limitations of current scholarship, explores vital new questions within the field, and opens up fascinating new terrain for scholarly inquiry.
As the cultural standing of literary modernism has eroded (when was the last time anybody at a cocktail party cared whether you were familiar with Ezra Pound's Cantos?
Seen in the light of this shaping vision, writers like John Lydgate, whose purely literary importance may be slight, acquire a new importance.
Brownell started her own literary career as a mostly unpaid business manager of Horizon, a literary and art review founded in 1940 by the brilliant Cyril Connolly (who'd known George Orwell at Eton) and his friend Peter Watson.
Leavis, as forming "one of the most formidable literary partnerships ever.
Though both Benedict and Swann are literary critics, Benedict places a greater emphasis on the interpretation of canonical texts.
In literary terms we don't have to like Jesus, or read him in the best light and ourselves in the worst.
The more fundamental paradox between Loos's literary output and his architecture is not recognized.
In The Arabic Literary Heritage, Allen provides the general reader with a highly digestible and extremely useful account of an otherwise intractable, if not quite unmanageable, field of discourse.
There are 58 separate variants now available of the chapter called "The Wife of Bath's Prologue," and differences abound, bedeviling literary scholars.
The fact is, the gay literary establishment has its sacred cows as well as its cardinal rules.
American literary critic and social historian who chronicled the writers of the Lost Generation of the 1920s and their successors.