liquorice


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glyc·yr·rhi·za

(glis-i-rī'ză),
The dried rhizome and root of Glycyrrhiza glabra (family Leguminoseae) and allied species; a demulcent, mild laxative, and expectorant; also used to disguise the taste of other remedies; its action appears to depend on glycyrrhizic acid, a salt-retaining glycoside that mimics the action of aldosterone.
Synonym(s): licorice, liquorice
[G. fr. glykys, sweet, + rhiza, root]

liquorice

A preparation from the root of a legume, usually Glycyrrhiza glabra, which contains asparagine, betaine, chalcones, choline, coumarins, flavonoids, glycyrrhizin, gums, isoflavonoids and saponins. Liquorice has a high content of glycyrrhizic acid—glucuronic acid + glycyrrhetinic acid—which is structurally similar to steroids, explaining its anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and antirheumatic effects; it is antitussive, demulcent, expectorant, laxative, sedative and reduces serum glucose and cholesterol.
 
Chinese medicine
Liquorice is used topically for abscesses and wounds, and internally for abdominal pain and spasms, alcohol and other intoxications, asthma, cholecystitis, cirrhosis, colds, coughing and wheezing, constipation, diabetes, fever, gastritis, gastric ulcers, heartburn, hepatitis, lung congestion, and sore throat.
 
Herbal medicine
In Western herbal medicine, Glycyrrhiza glabra is used topically for eczema, herpes and skin infections, and internally for arthritis, colic, constipation, cough, gastric ulcers, hepatitis and for many of the same conditions as Chinese medicine.
 
Toxicity
Excess liquorice causes mineralocorticoid excess (e.g., suppresses 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and the RAA axis), with sodium and water retention, hypertension, hypokalemia and myopathy with myoglobulinuria; it should not be used in patients with glaucoma, hypertension, renal disease or pregnancy.

Sexology
Liquorice has an unsubstantiated reputation as an aphrodisiac. Its erotic power is mentioned in the Kama Sutra, and liquorice potions are recommended for “sexual vigour”. Liquorice odours are said to increase blood flow to the genitalia.

glyc·yr·rhi·za

(glis'i-rī'ză)
Dried rhizome and root of Glycyrrhiza glabra and allied species; demulcent, mild laxative, and expectorant.
Synonym(s): licorice.
[G. fr. glykys, sweet, + rhiza, root]
References in periodicals archive ?
Liquorice may be taken as a tea or by simply chewing the root.
The active ingredient in liquorice is glycyrrhetinic acid which inhibits the enzyme 11-0-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.
If you really, really love liquorice as I do, the FDA says: "No matter what your age, don't eat large amounts of black liquorice in one go."
Liquorice, a unique "guide drug" of traditional Chinese medicine: a review of its role in drug interactions.
Liquorice (scientific name Glycyrrhiza glabra) is historically used for GI complaints.
With black writing icing, stick a Liquorice Allsort on top of each Pontefract cake and pipe on two eyes.
For example, liquorice root Glycyrrhiza contains different substances that help to alleviate disorders of the airways and digestive system.
Kaneka's liquorice root extract Glavonoid [TM] Novel Food status means that manufacturers now have a new health ingredient for building slimming and weight management products, especially those which target visceral fat reduction.
Tian Tian and Yang Guang went on public display for the first time during the weekend, and Ms Gawthorne was there, with the Panda Liquorice panda to meet them and introduce their liquoriceloving namesake.
THE TASTE for liquorice is surprisingly well defined in geographical terms in Germany and its neighbouring countries.
PREGNANT women who stuff themselves with liquorice can harm their children's IQ, research has found.