liquor


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liquor

 [lik´er, li´kwor]
1. a liquid, especially an aqueous solution, containing medicinal substances.
2. a term applied to certain body fluids.
liquor am´nii amniotic fluid.
liquor cerebrospina´lis cerebrospinal fluid.
liquor folli´culi the fluid in the cavity of a developing graafian follicle.
liquor pu´ris the fluid portion of pus.

li·quor

, gen.

li·quor·is

, pl.

li·quo·res

(li'kŏr, -wōr-is, -wō'rēs), [TA] As a Latin word, liquor (as in the phrase liquor folliculi) is pronounced lī'kwōr by speaker of English. As an English word (as in spirituous liquor) it is pronounced lĭk'er.
1. Any liquid or fluid.
See also: solution.
2. A term used for certain body fluids.
See also: solution.
3. The pharmacopoeial term for any aqueous solution (not a decoction or infusion) of a nonvolatile substance and for aqueous solutions of gases.
See also: solution.
[L.]

liquor

/li·quor/ (lik´er) (li´kwor) pl. liquors, liquo´res   [L.]
1. a liquid, especially an aqueous solution containing a medicinal substance.
2. a term applied to certain body fluids.

liquor am´nii  amniotic fluid.
liquor cerebrospina´lis  cerebrospinal fluid.
liquor folli´culi  follicular fluid.

liquor

[lik′ər]
1 any fluid or liquid, such as liquor amnii, the amniotic fluid.
2 an alcoholic beverage.
A drinkable liquid containing ethanol produced by distilling fermented grain, fruit, or vegetables, which contrasts to undistilled fermented beverages—e.g., beer and wine. Hard liquor is generally used for a spirit with high—e.g., 30%—ethanol content and includes gin, rum, tequila, vodka, and whisky.

liquor

Medtalk A fluid, usually aqueous containing a medicinal. See Herbal liquor Vox populi A beverage with a high–generally > 20%–concentration of ethanol. See Hard liquor.

li·quor

, pl. liquores (līkwōr, lī-kwōrēz) [TA]
1. Any liquid or fluid.
2. A term for certain body fluids.
3. The pharmacopeial term for any aqueous solution (not a decoction or infusion) of a nonvolatile substance and for aqueous solutions of gases.
See also: solution

li·quor

, pl. liquores (līkwōr, lī-kwōrēz) [TA] As a Latin word, liquor is pronounced lī'kwōr. As an English word it is pronounced lik'ĕr.
1. Any liquid or fluid.
2. A term usedfor certain body fluids.
3. Pharmacopoeial term for any aqueous solution of a nonvolatile substance.

liquor

1. a liquid, especially an aqueous solution, containing medicinal substances.
2. a term applied to certain body fluids.

liquor amnii
amniotic fluid.
liquor cerebrospinalis
cerebrospinal fluid.
liquor folliculi
the fluid in the cavity of a developing graafian follicle.
liquor pericardii
pericardial fluid.
liquor pleurae
pleural fluid.

Patient discussion about liquor

Q. Is wine or beer safer to drink than liquor? My new girl friend requests me to quit liquor. Is wine or beer safer to drink than liquor?

A. Wine or beer is not safer to drink than liquor. Liquor is liquor. A twelve - ounce beer has the same amount of alcohol as a five - ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 - ounce shot of liquor. It is the amount of ethanol consumed that affects a person most, not the type of alcoholic drink.

Q. Is holding liquor a sign of a drinking problem? How can I have a drinking problem if I can hold my liquor? Is holding liquor a sign of a drinking problem?

A. "being able to hold your liquor" is actually the liver gathering forces...let's imagine that our liver is a factory that disables alcohol as a poison. and i have a 100 workers over there. if i'll drink great amount of alcohol my workers will be busy and most of the alcohol will run along in my body. but after a few times i'll hire more workers. then less alcohol will run along my body and i'll disable it fast. same thing in your body.

Q. I drink liquor a lot maybe 4x a week and I love drinking but after a couple days my veins star to hurt...Y? It runs in the familly alcohol and bud but I wish I could go a whole year withought poppin bottles.. what will be perscibed to a alki?

A. FROM ALL THAT DRINKING

More discussions about liquor
References in classic literature ?
Keep your liquor in the name of all the devils, and leave me to myself
Passepartout felt himself yielding more and more to the effects of the liquor.
Then he felt and felt again the contents of the tankard he held in his hand; and, instead of the lively liquor expected by Blaisois and Musqueton, he found beneath his fingers the grains of some coarse powder.
As the liquor diffused a pleasant perfume, the old people doubted not that it possessed cordial and comfortable properties; and though utter sceptics as to its rejuvenescent power, they were inclined to swallow it at once.
Moti Guj never trampled the life out of Deesa on these occasions, for he knew that after the beating was over, Deesa would embrace his trunk and weep and call him his love and his life and the liver of his soul, and give him some liquor.
He is a very temperate man, and you could not fancy him in liquor last night?
He was in the English hospital for seven weeks, and when he came out they told him his only chance was to give up liquor.
When a man as is father of a family has been an' spent money at market and made himself the worse for liquor, he's done enough mischief for one day.
Mental exhaustion did not produce a craving for liquor such as physical exhaustion did, and he had felt no need for it.
Liberality in the matter of liquor and small loans, reconciled a large proportion of the objectors to their fate; the sulky minority I treated with contempt, and scourged avengingly with the smart lash of caricature.
The liquor mounted in the heads of all of us, and the talk of Scotty and the harpooner was upon running the Easting down, gales off the Horn and pamperos off the Plate, lower topsail breezes, southerly busters, North Pacific gales, and of smashed whaleboats in the Arctic ice.
The craving for strong liquor (the doctor wrote) was in the family.